Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to find a family of maximally unbalanced red-black trees and to prove the "respective attributes" of that family to prove that there is an infinitely big family of red black trees that have a height close to 2log(n+1).

Now my guess is that this family consists of basically all the red black trees that have one path with s-r-s-r ... nodes and the rest filled with black nodes. But how do I prove this? and how do i formally write down how such a family looks like?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

Now my guess is that this family consists of basically all the red black trees that have one path with s-r-s-r ... nodes and the rest filled with black nodes.

That's a reasonable guess.

But how do I prove this?

Describe an infinite sequence of trees T_0, T_1, T_2, T_3, ..., such that, for every integer n, there exists a tree in the sequence with at least n nodes. Show that there exists a constant C such that, for every i, the height of T_i is at least 2log(n_i+1) - C, where n_i is the number of nodes in T_i. (This is one possible interpretation of the ambiguous term "close to".)

how do i formally write down how such a family looks like?

Inductively. I'll do the all-black trees as an example. The tree T_0 is empty (base case). For all integers i > 0, the tree T_i consists of a black node with left and right subtrees equal to T_{i-1} (inductive step). Then you can prove facts about these trees using induction.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for your help! –  user2561873 Jul 10 '13 at 20:38
    
Well, obviously I have to insert something to get these 2log(n+1) rbtrees and to think about which numbers i have to insert to get the maxrbtree - then generalize the result and that's the proof? how can that be? –  user2561873 Jul 11 '13 at 11:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.