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I have a file that contains:

<html>
    <h1>Hello There</h1>
    <p>
    This is an example of a pml file
    </p>
    <pml>
    def f():
        return "<h2>First PML block</h2>"
    pml = f()
    </pml>
    <p>Here is another paragraph</p>
    <pml>
    def g():
        return "<h2>Second PML block</h2>"
    pml = g()
    </pml>
    <p>This is the last paragraph.</p>
    <pml>
    def h():
        return "<h2>Third PML block</h2>"
    pml = h()
    </pml>
</html>

I'm writing a python script that will produce an output file that replaces the pml blocks with the result of the code in the block. I want the output file to look like:

<html>
<h1>Hello There</h1>
<p>
This is an example of a pml file
</p>
<h2>First PML block</h2>
<p>Here is another paragraph</p>
<h2>Second PML block</h2>
<p>This is the last paragraph.</p>
<h2>Third PML block</h2>
</html>

Here is my script:

import sys

#define main

def main(argv):
    #make sure usage is proper
    if len(sys.argv) != 3:
        print 'Usage: pmlparser.py <input_file> <output_file>'
    else:
          #get the filenames
          inputfilename = sys.argv[1]
          outputfilename = sys.argv[2]
          #open the files
          with open(inputfilename,"r") as inputfile, open(outputfilename,"w") as outputfile:    
                  for line in inputfile:
                         if not "<pml>" in line:
                               outputfile.write(line)
                         else:
                               pmlfile = open("pmlcode.py","a")
                               for line in inputfile:
                                       if not "</pml>" in line:
                                              pmlfile.write(line[1:])
                                       else:
                                              #I think the problem is somewhere in here
                                              pmlfile.close()
                                              import pmlcode
                                              outputfile.write(pmlcode.pml + "\n")
                                              break         

if __name__ == "__main__":
   main(sys.argv[1:])

Unfortunately, I get the following as my result:

<html>
<h1>Hello There</h1>
<p>
This is an example of a pml file
</p>
<h2>First PML block</h2>
<p>Here is another paragraph</p>
<h2>First PML block</h2>
<p>This is the last paragraph.</p>
<h2>First PML block</h2>
</html>

I am iteratively importing pmlcode.py, and trying to write the new value for pml to the outputfile. However, this script keeps writing the original value for pml to the output file.

I've tried the following as a test:

a.py:

def f():
    return 1
var = f()
def g():
    return 2
var = g()

b.py:

import a
print a.var

$> python b.py

2

I just started learning Python yesterday, so I apologize if my question sounds dumb or if I'm misunderstanding something. I appreciate any help!

share|improve this question
    
Not a bad code for someone who started to learn Python yesterday :) –  Pawel Miech Jul 10 '13 at 18:20
    
Importing a module a second time doesn't do anything. What is the nature of your pmlcode file? –  BrenBarn Jul 10 '13 at 18:20
    
Stephan: I've already given expected output. –  jreancsu Jul 10 '13 at 18:28
    
do you have to do pml = f(), pml = g(), pml = h() every time? or do you care that the variable be named differently –  Stephan Jul 10 '13 at 18:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

import is not the tool you want here. As you discovered, once you've imported a module, you always get the same module; Python caches it in memory for performance. The problem, in other words, is not that pmlcode.py isn't getting updated, but rather that it is only actually read the first time import pmlcode is executed.

Since you already have a string, why write it to a file and then import it? Just use exec directly on the string.

share|improve this answer
    
Additionally, you can pass an explicit globals dictionary to the exec statement and read the value of pml out of the dict after the exec. –  user2357112 Jul 10 '13 at 18:26
    
kindall, Thanks for the response. I'll give the exec thing a try! Like I said, I just started using Python for the first time yesterday. I haven't really seen the exec method/function/keyword/whateverit'scalled until now. –  jreancsu Jul 10 '13 at 18:30
    
Just had to say: you can use imp.reload to get changes made to an already imported module. –  iCodez Jul 10 '13 at 18:34
    
Yes you can reload modules... still, writing a string to the file and then importing the file is the long way 'round. –  kindall Jul 10 '13 at 18:36
    
If I import imp and pmlcode at the very top of my script, and replace the previous line that said "import pmlcode" with imp.reload(pmlcode), I still get the same incorrect output....:( –  jreancsu Jul 10 '13 at 19:41

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