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$(document).ready(function() {

    $('#domain').change(function() {

        //

    });

});

The code inside the change function will basically send ajax request to run a PHP script. The #domain is a text input field. So basically what I want to do is to send ajax requests as user types in some text inside the text field (for example search suggestions).

However, I would like to set a time interval in order to lessen the load of PHP server. Because if jQuery sends AJAX request every time user adds another letter to the text field it would consume lots of bandwidth.

So I would like to set let's say 2 seconds as an interval. The AJAX request will be fired every time the user types a letter but with maximum frequency of 2 seconds.

How can I do that?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you really want to do is check how long since the last change event so you keep track of the number of milliseconds between events rather than make a call every 2 seconds.

$(document).ready(function() {

    var lastreq = 0; //0 means there were never any requests sent
    $('#domain').change(function() {
         var d = new Date();
         var currenttime = d.getTime(); //get the time of this change event
         var interval = currenttime - lastreq; //how many milliseconds since the last request
         if(interval >= 2000){ //more than 2 seconds
            lastreq = currenttime; //set lastreq for next change event
            //perform AJAX call
         }

   });

});
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this need a mop-up function to send the last update to the server? – Bell Nov 18 '09 at 17:59
    
@Bell it does not. It is tied to the change event so if this change event is more than 2 seconds since the last change event then it sends the call otherwise it just ignores the event. Although I think that @d's solution is cleaner and its the one I would go with. – Vincent Ramdhanie Nov 18 '09 at 18:02
    
What about if I type two characters, and the second one hits during the time when it should not send... but i never type the third char to trigger it again? – Ape-inago Nov 18 '09 at 18:20
$(function() {
  var timer = 0;
  $("#domain").change(function() {
    clearTimeout(timer);
    timer = setTimeout(function(){
      // Do stuff here
    }, 2000);
  });
});
share|improve this answer
$(document).ready(function() {

    var ajaxQueue;

    $('#domain').change(function() {

        if(!ajaxQueue) {
           ajaxQueue = setTimeout(function() { 
              /* your stuff */
              ajaxQueue = null;
          }, 2000);
        }

    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
Where is ajaxQueue declared? – svinto Nov 18 '09 at 17:53
    
This would only fire once. – eduncan911 Nov 18 '09 at 17:54
    
That's the brilliance, it's defined right in the setTimeout. Until then it will be undefined (and, thus, falsey). It's effectively the same as writing var ajaxQueue = null; right before the $(document).ready(...). – rfunduk Nov 18 '09 at 17:55
    
This is actually a quite elegant solution. Definitely better than tracking the number of milliseconds between events. – Vincent Ramdhanie Nov 18 '09 at 17:58
    
Hmm. The ajax call isn't getting executed even once with this code. – Richard Knop Nov 18 '09 at 18:22

two variables, charBuffer, sendFlag

  1. Use a setTimeout to have a function be called every two seconds.
    • This function checks if the buffer has stuff in it.
    • If it does, it sends/empties the stuff and clears the sent flag (to false).
      • and It should also clear the timeout, and set it again
    • else it sets the flag (to true).
  2. Everytime the user hits a key, store it in the buffer.
    • if the sent flag is clear (it's false), do nothing.
    • else (it's true) send/empty the stuff currently in the buffer and clear the flag (to false),
      • and It should also clear the timeout, and set it again

This will make it so that the first time you press a key, it is sent, and a minimum of 2 seconds must pass before it can send again.

Could use some tweaking, but i use this setup to do something similar.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, the text input field could be the buffer... so much of this could be redundant. – Ape-inago Nov 18 '09 at 18:16

Off the top of my head without trying this in a browser. Something like this:

$('#domain').change(function() {

    if (!this.sendToServer) { // some expando property I made up
    	var that = this;
    	this.sendToServer = setTimeout(function(that) {
    		// use "that" as a reference to your element that fired the onchange.
    		// Do your AJAX call here
    		that.sendToServer = undefined;
    	}, yourTimeoutTimeInMillis)
    }
    else {
    	clearTimeout(this.sendToServer);
    }
});
share|improve this answer

I am coming across this problem more and more (the more i do UI ajax stuff) so i packaged this up into a plugin available here

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