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Following the example here:

http://rspec.info

however it fails with:

kernel_require.rb:45:in `require': cannot load such file -- bowling.rb (LoadError)

even though I've got a bowling.rb file.

Any suggestions?

UPDATE

Project listing:

ls -l
-rw-r--r--  1 snowcrash  snowcrash   77 10 Jul 19:43 bowling.rb
-rw-r--r--  1 snowcrash  snowcrash  205 10 Jul 19:49 bowling_spec.rb

$ rspec bowling_spec.rb 
/Users/snowcrash/.rvm/rubies/ruby-2.0.0-p195/lib/ruby/site_ruby/2.0.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:45:in `require': cannot load such file -- bowling (LoadError)

and code listings:

Spec:

# bowling_spec.rb
require 'bowling'

describe Bowling, "#score" do
  it "returns 0 for all gutter game" do
    bowling = Bowling.new
    20.times { bowling.hit(0) }
    bowling.score.should eq(0)
  end
end

Class file:

# bowling.rb
class Bowling
  def hit(pins)
  end

  def score
    0
  end
end
share|improve this question
1  
Can you show your project structure? It's probably complaining because it can't find the file in the load path. – Leo Correa Jul 10 '13 at 18:57

The rspec home page unfortunately does not tell you about initializing rspec in your project.

Assuming you have a project folder called 'bowling', inside the bowling folder run

rspec --init

This will create the spec directory and two files

spec/spec_helper.rb
.rspec

The .rspec file lets you define preferences like color and format

--color
--format documentation

Now in spec_helper.rb, add require "bowling"

# This file was generated by the `rspec --init` command. Conventionally, all
# specs live under a `spec` directory, which RSpec adds to the `$LOAD_PATH`.
# Require this file using `require "spec_helper"` to ensure that it is only
# loaded once.

require "bowling"

# See http://rubydoc.info/gems/rspec-core/RSpec/Core/Configuration
RSpec.configure do |config|
  config.treat_symbols_as_metadata_keys_with_true_values = true
  config.run_all_when_everything_filtered = true
  config.filter_run :focus

  # Run specs in random order to surface order dependencies. If you find an
  # order dependency and want to debug it, you can fix the order by providing
  # the seed, which is printed after each run.
  #     --seed 1234
  config.order = 'random'
end

Now inside your bowling_spec.rb, add `require "spec_helper"

require "spec_helper"

class Bowling
  def hit(pins)
  end

  def score
    0
  end
end

Also, any other specs you add you need to add require "spec_helper". The comments in spec_helper.rb explain why this is necessary.

Here is a good beginner explanation of setting up and working with rspec

Good luck

share|improve this answer

I'm a complete noob in ruby (coming from java) and had a similar problem to get rspec running. The above answer helped to point the right way but did not work for me at first.

After reading the provided link i got it running with the following solution:

first run rspec --init.

then i edited the spec_helper.rb file with require_relative '../bowling'.

looked like this:

# This file was generated by the `rspec --init` command. Conventionally, all
# specs live under a `spec` directory, which RSpec adds to the `$LOAD_PATH`.
# The generated `.rspec` file contains `--require spec_helper` which will cause this
# file to always be loaded, without a need to explicitly require it in any files.
#
# Given that it is always loaded, you are encouraged to keep this file as
# light-weight as possible. Requiring heavyweight dependencies from this file
# will add to the boot time of your test suite on EVERY test run, even for an
# individual file that may not need all of that loaded. Instead, consider making
# a separate helper file that requires the additional dependencies and performs
# the additional setup, and require it from the spec files that actually need it.
#
# The `.rspec` file also contains a few flags that are not defaults but that
# users commonly want.
#
require_relative '../bowling'

# See http://rubydoc.info/gems/rspec-core/RSpec/Core/Configuration
RSpec.configure do |config|
  # rspec-expectations config goes here. You can use an alternate
  # assertion/expectation library such as wrong or the stdlib/minitest
  # assertions if you prefer.
  config.expect_with :rspec do |expectations|

The other two files looked like this:

bowling_spec.rb:

# bowling_spec.rb    

describe Bowling, "#score" do
  it "returns 0 for all gutter game" do
    bowling = Bowling.new
    20.times { bowling.hit(0) }
    bowling.score.should eq(0)
  end
end

and bowling.rb:

# bowling.rb

class Bowling
  def hit(pins)
  end

  def score
    -1
  end
end

That was enough. I found it strange that there is no hint in the docs to run rspec --init first to get it running.

Maybe something is wrong with my installation (rbenv ) so that i have to use require_relative ?

share|improve this answer
    
If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. – ConcurrentHashMap Sep 13 '14 at 12:12

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