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I have these functions:

(def i (atom {})) ;incremented/calculated file stats

(defn updatei [n fic fos]
  (swap! i conj {(keyword n)[fic fos]}))

(defn calcfo [fo fi fis]
  (if-let [n (get @i fo)] ;find a previous record?
    (let [fic (inc (first n)), fos (+ fis (second n))] ;increment the stats
      (updatei fo fic fos))
    (let [fic 1, fos fis] ;if not then: first calc recorded
      (updatei fo fic fos))))

How could I write (updatei fo fic fos) once, instead of having it listed twice in the function? Is there a secret or-let I am unaware of?

-Hypothetical code-

(defn calcfo [fo fi fis]
  (if-let [n (get @i fo)] ;find a previous record?
    (let [fic (inc (first n)), fos (+ fis (second n))] ;increment the stats
    (or-let [fic 1, fos fis] ;if not then: first calc recorded
      (updatei fo fic fos)))))

Or am I thinking of this too imperatively versus functionally?

EDIT:

I decided this made the most sense to me:

(defn calcfo [fo fis]
  (apply updatei fo
  (if-let [[rfc rfos] (get @i fo)] ;find a previous record?
       [(inc rfc) (+ rfos fis)] ;increment the stats
       [1 fis]) ;if not then: first calc recorded
      ))

Thanks for the great answers!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A rearrangement might help

(defn calcfo [fo fi fis]
  (apply updatei fo
    (if-let [n (get @i fo)]
      [(inc (first n)), (+ fis (second n))]
      [1, fis] )))
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this might be my favorite. really easy to read and seems the most idiomatic –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 20:03
    
It's possible to use destruction inside of if-let: (if-let [[x y] (get @i fo)] [(inc x) (+ fis y)] [1 fis]. –  Leonid Beschastny Jul 10 '13 at 20:17
    
yes, I did this: (defn calcfo [fo fis] (apply updatei fo (if-let [[rfc rfos] (get @i fo)] ;find a previous record? [(inc rfc) (+ rfos fis)] ;increment the stats [1 fis]) ;if not then: first calc recorded )) –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 20:18
    
Or even (apply updatei fo (map + [1 fis] (or (get @i fo) 0)))... –  A. Webb Jul 10 '13 at 20:30

What about using an if and then destructuring? Here's an approach:

(defn calcfo [fo fi fis]
  (let [n         (get @i fo)                                 ;find a previous record?
        [fic fos] (if n 
                    [(-> n first inc) (-> n second (+ fis))]  ;increment the stats
                    [1 fis])]                                 ;if not then: first calc recorded
      (updatei fo fic fos)))

The argument fi doesn't seem to be being used so maybe you could remove it from the argument list.

(defn calcfo [fo fis] ,,,)

The usage of first and second could also be avoided with the use of destructuring when binding n in the let form:

(defn calcfo [fo fis]
  (let [[x y & _]  (get @i fo)
        [fic fos]  (if x [(inc x) (+ fis y)] [1 fis])]
    (updatei fo fic fos)))
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this is a great idea, let me try it out –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 19:26
    
I wasn't aware of that method of destructuring, thanks –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 19:30
    
Way are you using (or (and x res1) res2) instead of (if x res1 res2)? I mean, you're reimplementing if in your code. –  Leonid Beschastny Jul 10 '13 at 19:45
    
I'm curious why 'and x' is required, I don't understand that. I tried it out and it works with it, but not sure how to read it. I wrote my function as this, so replace x with rfc (recorded file count): (defn calcfo [fo fis] (let [[rfc rfos] (get @i fo) ;find a previous record? [fic fos] (or (and rfc [(inc rfc) (+ rfos fis)]) ;increment the stats [1 fis])] ;if not then: first calc recorded (updatei fo fic fos))) –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 19:48
    
@LeonidBeschastny Good point :). I just changed it. –  juan.facorro Jul 10 '13 at 19:48

I think you would sidestep the whole problem and make your code better if you rewrote updatei, something like:

 (defn- safe+ [a b]
   (if a (if b (+ a b) a) b))
 (defn updatei [n fic fos]
   (swap! i update-in [(keyword n)] #(vector (safe+ fic (first %)) (safe+ fos (second %)))))

There may be a better way to write that code, but the basic idea is to use update-in to either store the new values (if nothing was stored for that key before), or combine them with what is already there.

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You can simplify your update function by using mapv and partial instead of #() macro: (partial mapv safe+ [fic fos])). –  Leonid Beschastny Jul 10 '13 at 19:55
    
Interesting idea, I like the hashset; let me see how this works out –  scape Jul 10 '13 at 19:56
    
Just realized that mapv wont be able to handle initial nil value of a key. But fnil solves it: (fnil (partial mapv safe+ [fic fos]) [0 0]). In this case you don't need safe+ either. –  Leonid Beschastny Jul 10 '13 at 20:10
    
@LeonidBeschastny, why don't you go ahead and edit the code to make it better? I was really just trying to demonstrate the use of update-in. –  Alex D Jul 10 '13 at 21:14

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