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I wrote this code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){

        printf("Size of short int: %d \n", sizeof(short));
        printf("Size of int: %d \n", sizeof(int));
        printf("Size of long int: %d \n", sizeof(long));
        printf("Size of float: %d \n", sizeof(float));
        printf("Size of double: %d \n", sizeof(double));
        printf("Size of long double: %d \n", sizeof(long double));



    return 0;
}    

Where the output was:

Size of short int: 2
Size of int: 4
Size of long int: 4
Size of float: 4
Size of double: 8
Size of long double: 12

Naturally, there are differences between integers and floating point data types, but what is the reason behind any compiler allocating the same amount of memory to a long as it does to an int? The long was designed to handle larger values, but is put to no use if done like the above(for the case of the integer). The floating point long variety adds an additional 16 bits of allocation.

My question then, in essence, is why have the long if there will be instances of machines that make no use of its abilities?

From a K&R ebook:

The intent is that short and long should provide different lengths of integers where practical; int will
normally be the natural size for a particular machine. short is often 16 bits long, and int either 16 or
32 bits. Each compiler is free to choose appropriate sizes for its own hardware, subject only to the the
restriction that shorts and ints are at least 16 bits, longs are at least 32 bits, and short is no longer
than int, which is no longer than long.

Is there a "rule of thumb," if you will, for when a machine's compiler will opt to allocate more memory for a long than an int? And vice versa? What is the criteria?

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3  
Rule of thumb, if it's a 16-bit system, or a 64-bit system (not running Windows), then long is typically larger than int. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 10 '13 at 19:28
2  
You have to read the ANSI standard. The only requirement for long is that it must be large enough to hold an int. The compiler is free to use whatever size it feels best. –  sfstewman Jul 10 '13 at 19:29
2  
@sfstewman No, long must also be at least 32 bits wide. (And int must be at least 16 bits wide.) –  Daniel Fischer Jul 10 '13 at 19:31
    
Precisely as K&R has put it. I was just wondering of the criterion for this decision. –  sherrellbc Jul 10 '13 at 19:31
    
@DanielFischer Yes, you are correct. –  sfstewman Jul 10 '13 at 19:33
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a "rule of thumb," if you will, for when a machine's compiler will opt to allocate more memory for a long than an int? And vice versa? What is the criteria?

The criterion is likely "Will the target machine take advantage of a larger type?" or "Does the target machine have native registers and/or instructions which operate on this larger type?"

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I was assuming something to this nature. I was wondering if there was exact criteria, perhaps. As in, a 16/32 bit system is this way, 64 is that etc. –  sherrellbc Jul 10 '13 at 19:39
2  
@sherrellbc, for the sake of robustness it's often poor practice to have software rely on a "rule of thumb." But if you just want to gauge expectations, see @DanielFischer's comments: "if it's a 16-bit system, or a 64-bit system (not running Windows), then long is typically larger than int" –  Brian Cain Jul 10 '13 at 19:43
1  
@sherrellbc The exact criteria is the standard, which leaves this up to the compiler implementation. If you need a particular size, you're much better off using int32_t or int64_t defined in stdint.h. –  sfstewman Jul 10 '13 at 19:52
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Why have the long if there will be instances of machines that make no use of its abilities? Because some machines will make use of its abilities.

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I shouldn't have included that phrase because I address this concern later in the post when I ask the criteria. –  sherrellbc Jul 10 '13 at 19:30
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"int" are at least 16 bits and "long int" are at least 32 bits.

"int" can hold values up to 32,767 and "long int" can hold values up to 2,147,483,647.

In the limits.h header file, you can find the maximum and minimum values for the respective machines.

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On 32-bit and higher bit machines, size of long is equal to size of int which is 32bits. On 16 bit machines size of short is equal to size of int which is 16bits, while size of long is 32bits. So on 16bit machines long is 32bits which can hold large range than short and bit.

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"On 32-bit and higher bit machines, size of long is equal to size of int which is 32bits" is not a good rule of thumb because it's not true on many 64-bit machines (for example, x86_64-linux-gnu). –  Brian Cain Jul 11 '13 at 20:21
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