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Since there is no case insensitive string.Contains() (yet a case insensitive version of string.Equals() exists which baffles me, but I digress) in .NET, What is the performance differences between using RegEx.IsMatch() vs. using String.ToUpper().Contains()?

Example:

string testString = "tHiSISaSTRINGwiThInconSISteNTcaPITaLIZATion";

bool containsString = RegEx.IsMatch(testString, "string", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
bool containsStringRegEx = testString.ToUpper().Contains("STRING");

I've always heard that string.ToUpper() is a very expensive call so I shy away from using it when I want to do string.Contains() comparisons, but how does RegEx.IsMatch() compare in terms of performance?

Is there a more efficient approach for doing such comparisons?

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4  
Have you tried using Stopwatch? –  Sayse Jul 10 '13 at 19:34
2  
The only way to know which one is faster is to run them both and time them. This might help: stackoverflow.com/questions/457605/… –  kevingessner Jul 10 '13 at 19:35
3  
What about testString.IndexOf("string", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0? –  Justin Niessner Jul 10 '13 at 19:35
3  
IN MOST CASES avoid using ToLower / ToUpper for such things. It's bad practise –  Fabian Bigler Jul 10 '13 at 19:37
3  
ToUpper / ToLower may trick you if you support a global world with many languages. –  Michael Viktor Starberg Jul 10 '13 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's a benchmark

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

        string testString = "tHiSISaSTRINGwiThInconSISteNTcaPITaLIZATion";

        sw.Start();
        var re = new Regex("string", RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            bool containsString = re.IsMatch(testString);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("RX: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            bool containsStringRegEx = testString.ToUpper().Contains("STRING");
        }


        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Contains: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            bool containsStringRegEx = testString.IndexOf("STRING", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0 ;
        }


        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("IndexOf: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

Results were

IndexOf (183ms) > Contains (400ms) > Regex (477ms)

(Updated output times using the compiled Regex)

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1  
Results on my PC: RX: 3032 Contains: 385 IndexOf: 97 (unoptimized build under mono) (PS. I made the Regex precompiled) –  sehe Jul 10 '13 at 19:47
    
@sehe - Thanks for the edit and data. –  keyboardP Jul 10 '13 at 19:47
    
What about Jitter? –  Ata Jul 10 '13 at 19:59
    
@Ata - Do you mean its impact on the results? I ran the code with an outside for loop over all three tests but the differences were negligible to the results above. –  keyboardP Jul 10 '13 at 20:02
    
yeah thats what I meant. Then it seem good. –  Ata Jul 10 '13 at 20:06

There is another version using String.IndexOf(String,StringComparison) that might be more efficient than either of the two you suggested:

string testString = "tHiSISaSTRINGwiThInconSISteNTcaPITaLIZATion";
bool contained = testString.IndexOf("string", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0;

If you need a culture-sensitive comparison, use CurrentCultureIgnoreCase instead of OrdinalIgnoreCase.

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I would expect RegEx.match to be slow based on personal experience with regular expression parsers in general. But as many folks have mentioned, profiling it is the best way to find out for sure. I've had to fix performance issues related to regular expression parsers, toLower and toUpper have never come back to bite me.

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