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Given the following 2 classes Example1 and Example2 and excluding all performance characteristics, do these two classes operate the exact same way. That is, regardless of how simple or complex either methodA or methodB is or can be, would the result of running these two classes, under all possible conditions (both internal and external), always be absolutely the same?

Example1

public class Example1
{
    public static void main (String [] args)
    {
        try
        {   
            // this will not compile since nextBoolean() is not static
            // boolean t = java.util.Random.nextBoolean();

            // changed to
            java.util.Random r = new java.util.Random();
        boolean t = r.nextBoolean();

            if (t)
            {
                methodA();
                methodB();
            }
        }
        catch (Throwable t)
        {
            t.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
    }

    private static void methodB ()
    {
        // code goes here
    }

    private static void methodA ()
    {
        // code goes here
    }
}

Example2

public class Example2
{
    public static void main (String [] args)
    {
        try
        {   
            boolean t = java.util.Random.nextBoolean();

            if (t)
            {
                methodA();
            }

            if (t)
            {
                methodB();
            }
        }
        catch (Throwable t)
        {
            t.printStackTrace(System.out);
        }
    }

    private static void methodB ()
    {
        // code goes here
    }

    private static void methodA ()
    {
        // code goes here
    }
}
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1  
Yes, they will give you same output. –  Rohit Jain Jul 10 '13 at 19:40
2  
You're basically asking if the if statement works reliably in the Java language? I am going to go out on a limb and say that it does. –  Colin Morelli Jul 10 '13 at 19:41
    
It depends on what you mean by "the same way". Two executions will not necessarily yield the same result because of the randomness introduced by the Random.nextBoolean call. However, they both follow the same execution paths, as in they will both perform the same operations on the same variables in the same order, it's just that the Random introduces variability because the seed changes (which is one of the inputs). –  Brian Jul 10 '13 at 19:46
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The results are not guaranteed to be absolutely the same, although in general they will be. Specifically, you can write a methodA and methodB implementation that would yield different results when run in Example1 and Example2, even if the class names of the main program were made the same before execution.

One way to accomplish this would be to generate the stack trace and then introspect on the line number for the execution of methodB, which is different in Example1 and Example2.

For example, the below methodB will result in different output when run in Example1 and Example2.

public static void methodB()
{
    int count = 0;

    StackTraceElement[] elements = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
    for (StackTraceElement element : elements)
    {
        count += element.getLineNumber();
    }

    System.out.println(count);
}

However, in general the programs will yield the same results since this type of logic based on stack traces or other such aspects is unusual.

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Interesting outside-the-box answer; although, we could still get the same output from the System.out.println(count); if the code were written as if (t){methodA();methodB();} in Example1 and if (t){methodA();} if (t){methodB();} in Example2. However, it can be argued that my origial question was not posed with these statements all on one line. –  Mike Jul 10 '13 at 22:21
    
@user2512399 Yep, very true. However, even then you might be able to differentiate by reading the class file from disk and doing something based on the raw bytes, assuming that the compiler does not optimize and produce identical byte code. I only posted this answer since you asked for an absolute guarantee, no matter how complex etc. –  increment1 Jul 10 '13 at 22:35
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Yes they are the same. Basically the question is asking if these two things are equal:

        if (t)
        {
            methodA();
            methodB();
        }

and

        if (t)
        {
            methodA();
        }

        if (t)
        {
            methodB();
        }

They are the same because t can't change in between method calls.

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Yes, they will produce the same output. The variable t cannot be altered by the methods, so there's no possibility of methodA preventing methodB from executing.

Equally, if methodA throws an exception, methodB won't execute in either case.

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1  
I feel it important to note that if t were, instead, a method call - these would not be the same. Performance aside, one would call the method of the if statement twice, the other would call it once. That is a very important distinction if the method in question actually does something. –  Colin Morelli Jul 10 '13 at 19:44
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They are the same. The if statement is the same in the two classes.

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