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I'm formatting GPS output logs and I need an efficient method to remove x number of lines above the line that contains a 0 and y number of lines below that line.

*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 0
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*

If the line contains "Position fix ind: 0", remove 6 lines above it and remove 3 lines below in and remove the line it is in

EDIT:

The input file is a .log file

EDIT 2:

input file

1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 0
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
 *--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 5
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
share|improve this question
    
So you want to remove both the delimiting lines? Shouldn't you just remove one? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 10 '13 at 20:01
    
you want to just get that line or save it in a file after you have deleted the lines above/below? –  Stephan Jul 10 '13 at 20:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
def remLines(infilepath, outfilepath, delim, above, below):
    infile = open(infilepath)
    outfile = open(outfilepath, 'w')
    buff = []
    line = infile.readline()
    while line:
        if line.strip() == delim:
             buff = []
             for _ in range(below): # need to error check here, if you're not certain that your input file is correctly formatted
                 infile.readline()
        else:
            if len(buff) == above:
                outfile.write(buff[0])
                buff = buff[1:]
            buff.append(line)
        line = infile.readline()
    outfile.write(''.join(buff))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    remLines('path/to/input', 'path/to/output', "Position fix ind: 0", 6,3)

Testing:

Input:

1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 0
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
 *--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 5
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*
3
2
1

Output:

1
2
3
3
2
1
1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 5
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
share|improve this answer
    
If you're familiar with other programming languages like Java or C, you know that there's a special function called main, which gets executed first. Similarly, if you run a python file with if __name__ == "__main__":, the code in that scope is what is executed first –  inspectorG4dget Jul 10 '13 at 21:02
    
The code works but it only deletes the row with "Position fix ind: 0" and leaves the rest alone –  user2345223 Jul 10 '13 at 21:08
    
It works now! Thank you! And sorry for the trouble –  user2345223 Jul 10 '13 at 21:39
    
It has the error that all digits not in the starred area and also letters are excluded and everything else is erased. input file is at: mediafire.com/download/07y2xpn8xvm81vj/input.txt MD5: 6e473af83165e3004dcc19280d783126 SHA1: c37d8078ad8cd146ae8074ce9b75409ff1e26b34 –  user2345223 Jul 11 '13 at 13:40
    
I just ran this code against your input file. I got what I think is the expected output. I need a more detailed explanation as to how the observed output differs from the expected –  inspectorG4dget Jul 11 '13 at 16:33

If the files aren't too large:

 import re
 p = re.compile(r'(?:.*\n){6}\s*Position fix ind: 0\n(?:.*\n){3}')
 with open('test.txt') as f:
    output = p.sub('', f.read())
share|improve this answer

You can use a set here, iterate over the file and as soon as you see 'Position fix ind: 0' in a line(say, index of the line is i), then add a set of numbers from i-6 to i+3 to a set.

f = open('abc')
se = set()
for i,x in enumerate(f):
    if 'Position fix ind: 0' in x:
        se.update(range(i-6,i+4))
f.close()

Now iterate over the file again and skip those indexes that are present in that set:

f = open('abc')
f1 = open('out.txt', 'w')
for i,x in enumerate(f):
    if i not in se:
        f1.write(x)
f.close()
f1.cose()

input file:

1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 0
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
 *--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
            UTC Time: 000000.00
           Latitude: 0000.0000
            N/S ind.: N
           Longitude: 0000.0000
         E/W ind: E
    Position fix ind: 5
     Satellites Used: 3
        MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*
3
2
1

output:

1
2
3
3
2
1
1
2
3
*--------------------------------------*
UTC Time: 000000.00
Latitude: 0000.0000
N/S ind.: N
Longitude: 0000.0000
E/W ind: E
Position fix ind: 5
Satellites Used: 3
MSL Altitude: 00.0
*--------------------------------------*
3
2
1
share|improve this answer
    
Was with part of python 2.5 (it's been a while since I've switched to 2.7)? –  inspectorG4dget Jul 10 '13 at 20:08
1  
@inspectorG4dget: If you do from __future__ import with_statement. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 10 '13 at 20:11
2  
@inspectorG4dget Docs say it was introduced in py2.5 only. docs.python.org/2/reference/… –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 10 '13 at 20:14
    
>>> C:/Users/*****/Documents/answer2.py:1: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6 –  user2345223 Jul 10 '13 at 21:11
    
@user2345223 script stops after the warning? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 10 '13 at 21:15

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