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I am writing a table view application for iOS and weather is something I am implementing.

In my first section (section 0) I have 9 rows (0-8) of rudimentary data.

-(NSArray *)currentDataValues
{
    return @[
         [self dataValueForKey:@"cloudCover"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"dewPoint"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"humidity"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"precipIntensity"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"precipProbability"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"temperature"],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"visibility"],
         [self windDirection:[self.currentValuesDict valueForKey:@"windBearing"]],
         [self dataValueForKey:@"windSpeed"]];
}

Then in my cellForRowAtIndexPath I have the following.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    NSString *cellIdentifier;

    if (indexPath.section == 0) {
        cellIdentifier = @"Summary Cell";
    } else {
        cellIdentifier = @"Minutely Cell";
    }

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifier];

    if (!cell) {
        cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleValue1 reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier];
    }

    if([indexPath section] == 0){
        cell.textLabel.text = [self.currentDataPoints objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]];
        cell.detailTextLabel.text = [self.currentDataValues objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]];
    }

Now, everything WORKS. The cells generate just as id expect for them to, and it works the way I envisioned it.

The problem/question.

As you noticed in the currentDataValues method, at one point I am calling another method to return the Wind Direction, it looks like this (shortened for brevity).

-(NSString *)windDirection:(NSNumber *)value
{
    NSLog(@"%@", value);
    if (value.floatValue > 11.25 && value.floatValue < 33.75) {
        return @"North North East";
    } else if (value.floatValue > 33.75 && value.floatValue < 56.24) {
        return @"North East";
    }
}

I've got the log in there for testing, and therein lies the problem. When that method gets called I get 9 log messages when I should only get 1.

2013-07-10 16:19:13.502 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.503 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.503 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.503 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.504 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.504 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.504 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.505 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260
2013-07-10 16:19:13.505 XX Weather[48831:c07] 260

I have to assume this is going to cause a performance issue, and I don't understand why its happening.

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1  
Is this method called in a busy-waiting loop a million times a second? Or does it do heavy networking operations? If not, then don't worry about the 8 extra calls. –  user529758 Jul 10 '13 at 20:25
1  
Why you would expect it to only be called once? I would expect it to be called each time cellForRowAtIndexPath is called when the section is zero. –  Eric Petroelje Jul 10 '13 at 20:26
    
@H2CO3 its not a function of performance, rather, I was simply doing it wrong and wanted to rectify it. –  Peter Foti Jul 13 '13 at 19:40
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The -(NSArray *)currentDataValues method gets called for every single item that the tableview tries to display (9 if I understand correctly). In Objective-C, the "dot" syntax (such as your occurence of self.currentValuesDict) is really just an alias for calling the method with the same name. It does not perform any caching or fancy behavior under the hood. So the body :

{
return @[
     [self dataValueForKey:@"cloudCover"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"dewPoint"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"humidity"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"precipIntensity"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"precipProbability"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"temperature"],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"visibility"],
     [self windDirection:[self.currentValuesDict valueForKey:@"windBearing"]],
     [self dataValueForKey:@"windSpeed"]];
}

gets evaluated those 9 nine times, including the line where you call windDirection. You need to generate and cache this array either in the initalization of your table view controller, or the first time currentDataValues is called.

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It makes much more sense now. Thank you very much for your assistance matehat. –  Peter Foti Jul 13 '13 at 19:39
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Each time that cellForRowAtIndexPath calls the currentDataValues method, the dictionary inside that method is created and therefore windDirection called.

You should create that dictionary once, for example in viewDidLoad and store it in a property or instance variable of the table view controller.

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Your method "currentDataValues" is creating and returning a new array every time it is called. So every time tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: is called, it calls currentDataValues and constructs and returns a new array.

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If you want your method to gets called only once you can do something like this.

.h file:

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *currentDataValues;   

.m file:

{
  if (_currentDataValues == nil) {
    _currentDataValues = [self dataValueForKey:@"cloudCover"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"dewPoint"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"humidity"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"precipIntensity"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"precipProbability"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"temperature"],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"visibility"],
      [self windDirection:[self.currentValuesDict valueForKey:@"windBearing"]],
      [self dataValueForKey:@"windSpeed"]]
  }
  return _currentDataValues;
}

With this accessor to the currentDataValues your array will be created only once.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked, but question how come if you do: self.currentDataValues rather than _currentDataValues it sends it into an infinite loop? –  Peter Foti Jul 13 '13 at 19:38
    
Yes, it sends it into infinite loop. Let's say you changed _currentDataValues == nil condition to self.currentDataValues == nil. In this case, when you call currentDataValues for the first time it will have to call this getter for the second time because it will need to check, whether value of the currentDataValues is equal to nil and it will use getter to check this. This second call to getter will need call getter for the first time etc. –  Rafał Augustyniak Jul 14 '13 at 7:40
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