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What should be the signature of a method that takes a generic object and returns another generic object, one that either is the same or a sub class of the original class? That is, if the method takes some generic class A, the returned object is guaranteed to be either A or B such that B extends A (directly or indirectly)?

The code below exemplifies what I'm trying to do, in the function getList():

package com.company;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Main {
    private Main(){
         List<String> stringList = new GenericMessageListCreator.getList(StringGenericMessage.class);
    }

    private class GenericMessageListCreator() {
        public List<GenericMessage<T1>> getList(Class<T1 extends GenericMessage> clazz) {
            return new ArrayList<T1>();
        }
    }

    private class GenericMessage<T> {
        public GenericMessage(){};
        private T internalValue;

        public void setValue(T value) {
            this.internalValue = value;
        }

        public void echoValue() {
            System.out.println("I contain " + internalValue);
        }
    }

    private class StringMessage extends GenericMessage<String>{}
    private class IntegerMessage extends GenericMessage<Integer>{}
}

Example aside, in actuality I'm writing a registry of classes that are used for Commands in a command pattern. When I get an object by its class I want to fetch the appropriate Command and pass the object to it.

share|improve this question
    
What's the point of returning a GenericMessage<T> instead of just a T? –  Louis Wasserman Jul 10 '13 at 21:08
    
In this example none. The real reason I wanted to use it is explained in the end of the question. A actually want to return something that processes a T object A command. I then want to pass the origional object into that command and do something with the result. Returning a List<T1> is fine. Also I just choose list as something convenient that already has a generic signature. –  Wes Jul 10 '13 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you are looking for this signature:

public <T1 extends GenericMessage> List<GenericMessage<T1>> getList(Class<T1> clazz) {
    return new ArrayList<T1>();
}

You'll find more info about generic methods here.

EDIT

Based on what I understand from your sample code, I would go for something like (I corrected some syntax errors in your code):

private class GenericMessageListCreator {
    public <U, V extends GenericMessage<U>> List<U> getList(Class<V> clazz){
        return new ArrayList<U>();
    }
}

private class GenericMessage<T> {
    public GenericMessage(){};
    private T internalValue;

    public void setValue(T value)
    {
        this.internalValue = value;
    }

    public void echoValue() {
        System.out.println("I contain " + internalValue);
    }
}

private class StringMessage extends GenericMessage<String>{}
private class IntegerMessage extends GenericMessage<Integer>{}

Thus, you'll be able to create a List<String from `StringMessage like this:

List<String> stringList = new GenericMessageListCreator().getList(StringMessage.class);
share|improve this answer
1  
No need for the upper bound on T1. –  Paul Bellora Jul 10 '13 at 21:15
    
I don't get that workinging correctly. I get in idea two errors. <T1 extends GenericMessage says "Unexpected token" Class<T1> says "Expression expected" I already looked at this page but couldn't get it working based on that information. –  Wes Jul 10 '13 at 21:22
    
I based my answer on your code, but why do you return a new ArrayList<T1>() when your return type is List<GenericMessage<T1>>? –  ssssteffff Jul 10 '13 at 21:40
    
You have some syntax error in your code (for example, the parenthesis placed after GenericMessageListCreator, if you remove them you will not get the "Unexpected token" anymore). –  ssssteffff Jul 10 '13 at 21:50
1  
why pass in clazz if it is not used? –  newacct Jul 11 '13 at 1:53

I'm not even sure which method you want to have this behavious on, but I've assuming it's getList():

private class GenericMessageListCreator() {
    public <T extends GenericMessage<?>> List<T> getList(Class<T> clazz) {
        return new ArrayList<T>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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