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public class run
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {

        boolean b;
        int i=3;
        x=Integer.toString(i)=="3";
        System.out.println(x);

    }
}

according to my code it should return true,but outputting false.

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6  
Use .equals instead of == –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Jul 10 '13 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

Youre using == when you should use:

b=Integer.toString(i).equals("3");

I don't know why you use x. I'm assuming a typo.

Basically the == compares the reference used by the literal's being compiled in to the reference to a new string object created from an integer that, due to implementation details, may or may not have been interned.

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thank you and sorry for the typo. –  Sourav Pathak Jul 10 '13 at 22:12
    
@SouravPathak If this answer helped please click the gray checkmark next to it. –  hexafraction Jul 10 '13 at 22:13
public class run
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {

        boolean b;
        int i=3;
        x=Integer.toString(i).equals.("3");  // change in this line
        System.out.println(x);

    }
}

== compares the reference of object while equals method comapres the value.

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  1. You need to use equals instead of == for comparing String. Here's a good explanation as to why.

  2. You should get into the habit of writing equals like this:

    x= "3".equals(Integer.toString(i));
    

    Notice how the literal value is on the left hand side and not the right hand side like all these other answers. The benefit here is this avoids a possible null pointer exception if the value passed into equals() is a null. "3" can never be null. If you wrote your code like the other answers, to be as safe as possible, you'd have to add extra lines like this:

    String s = ...
    x = s != null && s.equals("3");
    

    It's less work to write it like this:

    String s = ...
    x = "3".equals(s);
    
share|improve this answer
    
Note that Integer.toString(i) will never return null. –  arshajii Jul 10 '13 at 21:49
    
@arshajii This is factually correct, but it's still good to get into the habit of writing equals() like this –  Daniel Kaplan Jul 10 '13 at 21:51

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