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I'm trying to get address of main() function in this way:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   void *pMainAddress=(void *)&main;
   printf("Address of main() 0x%08X \n", pMainAddress);

When I build project using Release configuration, the result is:
Address of main() : 0x00401000

This is under debugger:

00401000  /$  68 00104000  PUSH GetMain.00401000    ;  Entry address
00401005  |.  68 50A14000  PUSH GetMain.0040A150    ;  ASCII "0x%p \n"
0040100A  |.  E8 8B000000  CALL GetMain.0040109A

But when compiling with /Zi option, or use Debug build, address is redirected:
Address of main() : 0x0041178A. This address is obtained by performing an unconditional jump, the actual address is 0x00412530

This is under debugger:

00412530  /> \55                      PUSH EBP
...
00412539  |.  C745 FC 8A174100        MOV [LOCAL.1],GetMain.0041178A  ;  Entry address
00412540  |.  8B45 FC                 MOV EAX,[LOCAL.1]
00412543  |.  50                      PUSH EAX                                                         
00412544  |.  68 5CEC4200             PUSH GetMain.0042EC5C           ;  ASCII "0x%p \n"

Why this hapenes ?
How to get the real address of main() function (0x00412530 in above example) if code is compiled in Debug build ?

Edit:
Why this happens ? is already answered here: strange level of indirection of a function call

Function below solve my second question, Here I wrote answer .

void *GetMainAddress(void)
{
    void *pMainAddress=(void*)&main;/* address in main() function */
    unsigned long calculateJump=0;
    unsigned char *ptrJump;   
    printf("Address of main() : 0x%08X\n",  pMainAddress);


    ptrJump=(unsigned char*)pMainAddress;/* get pointer to main address */
    if(*(unsigned char*)ptrJump == 0xE9)/* address point to jmp opcode ? */
    {
        calculateJump = ( *(unsigned long *)(ptrJump+1) ); /* get address after 0xe9 */
        pMainAddress =  ptrJump + calculateJump + 5; /* calculate real address */
        printf("Unconditional jump is performed\n");
        printf("Actual sddress of main() is: 0x%08X \n", pMainAddress);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Unconditional jump is not performed\n");
    }
    return   pMainAddress;
}  
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possible duplicate of strange level of indirection of a function call –  Hans Passant Jul 11 '13 at 0:39
    
I think it is worth mentioning that in C++, unlike C, main() cannot be called recursively and cannot have its address taken. Be careful if mixing C and C++ code or compiler (although there are tons of other differences so mixing is no good anyway). –  user405725 Aug 7 '13 at 1:48
    
@VladLazarenko Lazarenko You're right, but in my case I do not call main(), only take the pointer to its address. When code is compiled with /ZI, pMainAddress is a pointer to a jump opcode, otherwise (Release Build) - it is the actual address of main() Also, I tested it before posting and it working in both language C and C++. –  boleto Aug 7 '13 at 3:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just omit the parentheses if you need to get a function address.

For example:

int main(){
    printf("main is at %p\n", main);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Strictly speaking you shouldn't be using %p to print a function pointer. –  Carl Norum Jul 10 '13 at 23:38
    
Why not? It doesn't seem it makes any difference between %p and %x. –  n0ne Jul 10 '13 at 23:40
4  
It's undefined behaviour. It almost certainly works on any reasonable machine, though. Relevant reading: stackoverflow.com/questions/2741683/… –  Carl Norum Jul 10 '13 at 23:41
1  
According to the C standard, function pointers do not have to be compatible with any object pointer type (including void *), so void *pMainAddress=&main; would be undefined behavior. POSIX.1, however, mandates that conversion of a function pointer to/from void * must work correctly. Note, however, that if you're trying to pass a function pointer to something like printf(), however, you must cast the pointer to void *. –  Elchonon Edelson Jul 11 '13 at 0:29
3  
The reason you should be using %p instead of %x when printing a pointer is that the %p conversion specifier is explicitly provided for the purpose of printing pointers, whereas %x is intended for the printing of unsigned int objects. On a 64-bit system there's every chance that a pointer will be twice as large as an unsigned int object, and this results in Undefined Behavior, because you'll be passing a 64-bit object to a variadic function that's only expecting 32 bits. (While UB really does mean "no guarantees", one likely result is that you'll only be printing half the pointer.) –  Elchonon Edelson Jul 11 '13 at 0:35

This is a solution how to get the actual address of main() function when Debug Information Format is set to /ZI in the project configuration on Visual Studio.
Here is my function :

void *GetMainAddress(void)
{
    void* pMainAddress = (void*)&main;
    unsigned long calculateJump = 0;
    unsigned char* ptrJump;

    ptrJump = (unsigned char*)pMainAddress;
    if(*(unsigned char*)ptrJump == 0xE9)
    {
        calculateJump = (*(unsigned long*)(ptrJump + 1));
        pMainAddress = (ptrJump + calculateJump + 5);
        printf("Unconditional jump is performed\n");
        printf("Address of main() : %#x \n", pMainAddress);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Unconditional jump is not performed\n");
        printf("Address of main() : %#x \n", pMainAddress);     
    }
    return   pMainAddress;
}

To test, use Visual Studio to create Console Applications and choose either Debug or Release from the Solution Configurations.
Place the GetAddressOfMain() in your int main(), and build solution .

Function also works with 64-bit project configuration, but you need to use an appropriate format specifier to print the addresses correctly .

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