Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

With distutils, setuptools, etc. a package version is specified in setup.py:

# file: setup.py
...
setup(
name='foobar',
version='1.0.0',
# other attributes
)

I would like to be able to access the same version number from within the package:

>>> import foobar
>>> foobar.__version__
'1.0.0'

I could add __version__ = '1.0.0' to my package's __init__.py, but I would also like to include additional imports in my package to create a simplified interface to the package:

# file: __init__.py

from foobar import foo
from foobar.bar import Bar

__version__ = '1.0.0'

and

# file: setup.py

from foobar import __version__
...
setup(
name='foobar',
version=__version__,
# other attributes
)

However, these additional imports can cause the installation of foobar to fail if they import other packages that are not yet installed. What is the correct way to share package version with setup.py and the package?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted
+50

Set the version in setup.py only, and read your own version with pkg_resources, effectively querying the setuptools metadata:

file: setup.py

setup(
    name='foobar',
    version='1.0.0',
    # other attributes
)

file: __init__.py

from pkg_resources import get_distribution

__version__ = get_distribution('foobar').version

To make this work in all cases, where you could end up running this without having installed it, test for DistributionNotFound and the distribution location:

from pkg_resources import get_distribution, DistributionNotFound
import os.path

try:
    _dist = get_distribution('foobar')
    # Normalize case for Windows systems
    dist_loc = os.path.normcase(_dist.location)
    here = os.path.normcase(__file__)
    if not here.startswith(os.path.join(dist_loc, 'foobar')):
        # not installed, but there is another version that *is*
        raise DistributionNotFound
except DistributionNotFound:
    __version__ = 'Please install this project with setup.py'
else:
    __version__ = _dist.version
share|improve this answer
1  
If this actually works reliably, it's much more elegant than my answer ... which makes me wonder why I haven't seen it elsewhere. Does anyone know whether this is a real concern? If it does report the wrong version number, its elegance is neither here nor there ... –  Zero Piraeus Jul 14 '13 at 12:46
1  
then why does authors of GitPython using totally different approach by saving version in a file named VERSION? –  Ciasto piekarz Feb 24 '14 at 18:07
3  
I don't like this solution: __version__ is resolved at run-time instead of at build-time as it should. IMHO I prefer having a static __version__ inside the source tree, and read it at build-time with some code in setup.py like in the answer below. –  Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:30
3  
I mean the difference between __version__ = "x.y.z" (which is parsed once by setup.py at build-time) and __version__ = some_weird_function() which is evaluated at run-time to recover info present only in setup.py and in foobar.egg-info. –  Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:47
1  
Agreed: my wording is not correct, as Python is an interpreted language. However it is important to remark the difference between a possible failure at build-time (if setup.py is not able to parse __version__ = 'x.y.z') or at run time (if get_distribution('foobar') fails to recover the correct info.) Your approach of course has many advantages, like the possibility of changing version number at build-time: python setup.py build --tag-date. What has to go into __version__: something burnt into the source tree, or some metadata computed at build-time and recovered at run-time? –  Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 12:36

I don't believe there's a canonical answer to this, but my method (either directly copied or slightly tweaked from what I've seen in various other places) is as follows:

Folder heirarchy (relevant files only):

package_root/
 |- main_package/
 |   |- __init__.py
 |   `- _version.py
 `- setup.py

main_package/_version.py:

"""Version information."""

# The following line *must* be the last in the module, exactly as formatted:
__version__ = "1.0.0"

main_package/__init__.py:

"""Something nice and descriptive."""

from main_package.some_module import some_function_or_class
# ... etc.
from main_package._version import __version__

__all__ = (
    some_function_or_class,
    # ... etc.
)

setup.py:

from setuptools import setup

setup(
    version=open("main_package/_version.py").readlines()[-1].split()[-1].strip("\"'"),
    # ... etc.
)

... which is ugly as sin ... but it works, and I've seen it or something like it in packages distributed by people who I'd expect to know a better way if there were one.

share|improve this answer
3  
tl;dr: Don't use imports in setup.py, read the version from a file. I'll have to think about this for a while to decide if I like the approach... –  Jace Browning Jul 13 '13 at 17:07
    
@JaceBrowning yeah, that's a fair summary ... I suspect any solution would have to be a variant of this, since it's importing the package in setup.py that causes problems. –  Zero Piraeus Jul 13 '13 at 20:16
    
I wonder if setuptools or distutils has a function to do this more gracefully? –  Jace Browning Jul 13 '13 at 20:31
2  
Having __version__ = "x.y.z" in the source and parsing it within setup.py is definitely the correct solution, IMHO. Much better that relying on run time magic. –  Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:22
    
And of course you can import re in your setup.py, if you'd like something more elegant or robust. –  Stefano M Dec 30 '14 at 10:37

Based on the accepted answer and comments, this is what I ended up doing:

file: setup.py

setup(
    name='foobar',
    version='1.0.0',
    # other attributes
)

file: __init__.py

from pkg_resources import get_distribution, DistributionNotFound

__project__ = 'foobar'
__version__ = None  # required for initial installation

try:
    __version__ = get_distribution(__project__).version
except DistributionNotFound:
    VERSION = __project__ + '-' + '(local)'
else:
    VERSION = __project__ + '-' + __version__
    from foobar import foo
    from foobar.bar import Bar

Explanation:

  • __project__ is the name of the project to install which may be different than the name of the package

  • VERSION is what I display in my command-line interfaces when --version is requested

  • the additional imports (for the simplified package interface) only occur if the project has actually been installed

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.