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Is the scope in Ruby similar or the same to the scope in Javascript i.e. functional scope (a new scope is only created when a function is created) or block scope? If they are different, what are some of the major differences?

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closed as too broad by the Tin Man, Qantas 94 Heavy, toro2k, eugen, Rico Mar 26 '14 at 0:48

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Your question is too broad. There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. –  the Tin Man Jul 11 '13 at 3:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The complete (I think) list is:

  • scripts,
  • module definitions,
  • class definitions and
  • method definitions

create new scopes,

  • blocks and
  • stabby lambda literals

create nested scopes (and are the only thing that creates nested scopes).

"Block" here means "the special syntactic construct that allows you to pass a single anonymous procedure as the last argument to any method"; it does not mean "the parts of an if expression" (or similar).

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Block scope. Variables newly defined in block cease to exist after the block; variables that were defined before the block keep their wider scope.

a = 1
1.times do
  a = 2 # outer scope
  b = 1 # block scope
end
puts a # 2
puts b # error

Here I use "block" in Ruby sense. If you take it in C sense, blocks do not have scope (i.e. if, while, begin etc. do not introduce new scope levels).

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1  
That's somewhat misleading because block-scope means one thing while Ruby-block means something else. For example, if(x) { ... } is a block in most languages when you're talking about scope but 1.times do ... end would be closer to an anonymous function in scope terms. Too much overloaded terminology. –  mu is too short Jul 11 '13 at 3:56
    
@muistooshort: Hehe, true. I should clarify... –  Amadan Jul 11 '13 at 4:05
    
If you mean "block" in the Ruby sense, then "block scope" and "function scope" are the same thing, because Ruby blocks are functions. –  Chuck Jul 11 '13 at 18:52

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