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I'm trying to improve the performance of a method we have which reprojects points from one coordinate system to another.

List<Point> Reproject(List<Point> points, string sourceProjection, string destinationProjection)

To do the coordinate transformation we pass the points into a 3rd party library (FME.) What I'm currently trying to achieve is to take the input list of points, select out only the distinct points from that list, pass only those into the transformation engine, then reconstruct the original list and return that to the client.

My basic plan is to use a Dictionary<Point, int> to get all the distinct points and assign an index to them, then reconstruct the original list with the index. Here's some rough code I wrote to test out this behaviour:

var distinctPoints = new Dictionary<Point, int>();
var distinctPointsMapping = new Dictionary<int, int>();
var pointNumber = 0;
var distinctPointNumber = 0;
foreach (var point in points)
{
    if (distinctPoints.ContainsKey(point))
    {
        distinctPointsMapping.Add(pointNumber, distinctPoints[point]);
    }
    else
    {
        distinctPoints.Add(point, distinctPointNumber);
        distinctPointsMapping.Add(pointNumber, distinctPointNumber);
        distinctPointNumber++;
    }

    pointNumber++;
}

Console.WriteLine("From an input of {0} points, I found {1} distinct points.", points.Count, distinctPointNumber);
var transformedPoints = new Point[distinctPointNumber]; // replace this with the call to the FME transformer

var returnVal = new List<Point>(points.Count);
pointNumber = 0;
foreach (var untransformedPoint in points)
{
    var transformedPoint = transformedPoints[distinctPointsMapping[pointNumber]];
    returnVal.Add(transformedPoint);
    pointNumber++;
}

return returnVal;

The problem I'm currently running into is OutOfMemoryException when doing more than about 8M points. I'm wondering if there's a better way to do this?

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I'll be honest. I'm not quite getting the reason why you have mappings and the int index pointers. What happens if you change your routine to: return points.Distinct().Select(p => FMETransform(p, sourceProjection, destinationProjection).ToList()? (I'm not sure what the "call to the FME transformer" is like, so I just put FMETransform) EDIT: At least this might help reduce the number of duplicated arrays that are millions long. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 11 '13 at 1:32
    
As per the method signature I have to return as many points to the client as they gave me, in the correct order, so it's unfortunately not as simple as just reducing the input to a set of distinct points and transforming that. –  Coxy Jul 11 '13 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1. Dictionaries use a lot of memory. Automatic resizing of large dictionaries is particularly trouble-prone (memory fragmentation => OOM long before you would expect it).

Replace:

var distinctPointsMapping = new Dictionary<int, int>();
...
distinctPointsMapping.Add(pointNumber, distinctPoints[point]);
...
distinctPointsMapping.Add(pointNumber, distinctPointNumber);

With:

var distinctPointsMapping = new List<Int>(points.Count);
...
distinctPointsMapping[pointNumber] = distinctPoints[point];
...
distinctPointsMapping[pointNumber] = distinctPointNumber;

2. To reduce memory fragmentation, consider setting an appropriate initial size for distinctPoints (which does need to be a dictionary, for fast lookup). Ideal size would be a prime number that is somewhat larger than points.Count. (I failed to find a reference to suggest how much larger -- maybe 25%?).

// You have to write "CalcDictionarySize". See above text.
int goodSize = CalcDictionarySize(points.Count);
var distinctPoints = new Dictionary<Point, int>(goodSize);

3. In the extreme case, request a GC prior to your code running. (This advice might be debatable. However, I have successfully used it myself, when I was unable to find any other way to avoid OOM.)

public void GarbageCollect_Major()
{
    // Force GC of two generations - to get any recent unneeded objects up to their finalizers.
    GC.Collect(1, GCCollectionMode.Forced);

    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

    GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);

    // This may be dubious. But it seemed to maintain more responsive system.
    // (perhaps 5-20 ms) Because full GC stalls .Net, give time to threads (related to GUI?)
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
}

Then at start of your method:

GarbageCollect_Major();

CAVEAT: Explicitly calling GC is NOT something to do lightly. Nor often. GC that is done "too often" might merely push objects from Gen 1 up to Gen 2, where they won't be collected, until a FULL GC is done. I call it only when user requests an operation that will take more than 5 seconds to complete, and that has been shown to be prone to OOM.

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Thanks very much for this answer. I replaced the Dictionary<int, int> with a List<int> as you suggested and then thought I might as well go the whole hog and replace it with an int[] which helped even more. Looking into the Dictionary constructor, there is no need for the CalcDictionarySize() method because the constructor will find the next largest prime based on the non-prime argument. Both of these enhancements let me fit another 3M points before running out of memory again, which is pretty good! –  Coxy Jul 11 '13 at 8:06
    
@Coxy Wonderful to hear. If it answered your needs, please "mark" it as the answer. Click on the "hollow checkmark" to the left of it, and it will turn solid. :) UPDATE Actually, it only got you a bit farther. So maybe don't mark it as answer yet... –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 11 '13 at 8:12
1  
oh cool, you marked it. I've made lots of edits, and secondary answers. I think this is my first actual, accepted answer. :) –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 11 '13 at 8:17

This solution might reduce the overall memory footprint, while maintaining order and only transforming unique points:

List<Point> Reproject(List<Point> points, string sourceProjection, string destinationProjection)
{
    List<Point> returnPoints = new List<Point>(points.Count);

    var transformedPoints = new Dictionary<Point, Point>();

    foreach(var point in points)
    {
        Point projectedPoint;
        if (!transformedPoints.TryGetValue(point, out projectedPoint))
        {
            projectedPoint = FMETransform(point, sourceProjection, destinationProjection);
            transformedPoints.Add(point, projectedPoint);
        }
        returnPoints.Add(projectedPoint);
    }

    return returnPoints;
}

But overall, probably still a good chunk of memory. If possible, perhaps you can sacrifice performance (transforming all points, even duplicates) in favour of reduced memory usage. Throw in some deferred processing and maybe you can only transform points as necessary then cease iterating, or at least let the garbage collector pick up on some old points once they're unused:

private IEnumerable<Point> Reproject(IEnumerable<Point> points, string sourceProjection, string destinationProjection)
{
    foreach(Point p in points)
        yield return FMETransform(p, sourceProjection, destinationProjection);
}
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