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byte[] message = ...
Socket socket = ...
DataOutputStream dOut = new DataOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());

dOut.write(message);  //#1
... //other code 

Let us assume that the machine 1 (with the code above) trying to send somethings to machine 2 that is trying to read byte from machine 1.

According to TCP, can I say that the codes after line #1 will not execute if the machine 2 has not yet successfully read the data that was sent from above?

But at what point, I can say the machine 2 already read the data and the codes after line #1 will execute? It happens at Operating System level or Application level? For example, machine 2 OS will buffer the message from machine 1 right after machine 1 execute writeByte command/statement, so machine 2 will signal machine 1 to proceed line #1?

Or machine 2 will only signal machine 1 to proceed if the Java application execute the readByte command/statement at Application level?

If the whole receiving process happens at OS level, how can we control the buffer size that used to cache the incoming data (in machine 2)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

TCP usually has local buffers. Java does not handle the comms, that is handled by the OS. Java accesses the local buffers, reads will empty bytes out of the buffer and writes will put bytes into a buffer.

Blocking IO behaves by blocking if you try to read from an empty buffer or write to a full buffer.

On receipt of a block of data the client will send an ack to the sender. The sender will empty that data from its buffer on receipt of the ack.

Bear in mind that various routers and switches along the route may have their own buffers and the sender may receive an ack prior to the client receiving any data.

Buffer size can be set by using the setReceiveBufferSize and setSendBufferSize methods.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/net/Socket.html

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If the sender receives an ACK before the receiver receives any data there is something seriously wrong with the intermediate routers. Or else time has suddenly changed direction. –  EJP Jul 11 '13 at 8:08
    
Hi @BevynQ, I know that dOut.write will only be blocked if the TCP send buffer is full. Let's assume that, dOut.write is blocked because buffer is full now, and the network has some problem in sending data, so TCP keep on re-transmit the data. In this case, will dOut.write throw exception after TCP exceed the maximum re-transmission time? Thanks for help. –  GMsoF Jul 15 '13 at 9:01
    
If there is a network issue you will probably get an unexpected socket closed exception(IOException). –  BevynQ Jul 15 '13 at 9:28
    
@BevynQ No. A 'socket closed' exception means that you closed the socket. Nothing to do with the network whatsoever. If the peer closed the exception you will get one of the various EOS indications when reading, or a 'connection reset' when writing, or if the network went down. –  EJP Jul 16 '13 at 10:37

If you want the sender to wait for the receiver, the receiver must send something back to the sender. Usually this is not something you should worry about as TCP handles all the hand shaking between one end and the other.

But at what point, I can say the machine 2 already read the data and the codes after line #1 will execute?

When machine #2 sends a machine saying it has read the message from #1

It happens at Operating System level or Application level?

At the application level because most applications don't need this guarantee.

For example, machine 2 OS will buffer the message from machine 1 right after machine 1 execute writeByte command/statement, so machine 2 will signal machine 1 to proceed line #1?

Machine #1 waits until a copy has been placed in it's buffer. It does not wait to place it into the #2 machines buffer or for it to be read.

Or machine 2 will only signal machine 1 to proceed if the Java application execute the readByte command/statement at Application level?

No such signal exists unless you add it.

If the whole receiving process happens at OS level, how can we control the buffer size that used to cache the incoming data (in machine 2)?

You can control it by setting it to the size you want. You don't need to change this most of the time and you don't need more controls than this.

You have to have a clear idea of what real, not imagined, program you are trying to solve and you may find that TCP already handles what you need.

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According to TCP, can I say that the codes after line #1 will not execute if the machine 2 has not yet successfully read the data that was sent from above?

No. The code will continue unless all the intervening buffers between you and the peer are full.

But at what point, I can say the machine 2 already read the data and the codes after line #1 will execute?

You can't, with this code. If you need to know that the peer has read the data it will have to send you a message that says so.

It happens at Operating System level or Application level?

'It' being what?

For example, machine 2 OS will buffer the message from machine 1 right after machine 1 execute writeByte command/statement, so machine 2 will signal machine 1 to proceed line #1?

No. The writeByte() will put the byte into your local kernel's TCP send buffer and your application will continue, unless the send buffer was full. Meanwhile, while your application is continuing, TCP will send the contents of its send buffer to the peer.

Or machine 2 will only signal machine 1 to proceed if the Java application execute the readByte command/statement at Application level?

No. Machine 2 doesn't 'signal machine 1 to proceed' at all.

If the whole receiving process happens at OS level, how can we control the buffer size that used to cache the incoming data (in machine 2)?

Socket.setReceiveBufferSize().

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