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By "Function Object", I mean an object of a class that is in some sense callable and can be treated in the language as a function. For example, in python:

class FunctionFactory:
    def __init__ (self, function_state):
        self.function_state = function_state
    def __call__ (self):
        self.function_state += 1
        return self.function_state

>>>> function = FunctionFactory (5)
>>>> function ()
6
>>>> function ()
7

My question is - would this use of FunctionFactory and function be considered a closure?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

A closure is a function that remembers the environment in which it was defined and has access to variables from the surrounding scope. A function object is an object that can be called like a function, but which may not actually be a function. Function objects are not closures:

class FunctionObject(object):
    def __call__(self):
        return foo

def f():
    foo = 3
    FunctionObject()() # raises UnboundLocalError

A FunctionObject does not have access to the scope in which it was created. However, a function object's __call__ method may be a closure:

def f():
    foo = 3
    class FunctionObject(object):
        def __call__(self):
            return foo
    return FunctionObject()
print f()() # prints 3, since __call__ has access to the scope where it was defined,
            # though it doesn't have access to the scope where the FunctionObject
            # was created
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The final print statement should be: print f()() Excellent explanation btw. – Cameron Goodale Jul 11 '13 at 14:43

... would this use of FunctionFactory and function be considered a closure?

Not per se, since it doesn't involve scopes. Although it does mimic what a closure is capable of.

def ClosureFactory(val):
  value = val
  def closure():
    nonlocal value # 3.x only; use a mutable object in 2.x instead
    value += 1
    return value
  return closure

3>> closure = ClosureFactory(5)
3>> closure()
6
3>> closure()
7
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Great, thank you - this explains it very well. – Owen Jul 11 '13 at 3:51

A closure is a piece of code that closes over the environment it is defined in, capturing its variables. In most of the modern languages, functions are closures, but it is not necessarily so, and you can imagine closures that are not function objects (such as Ruby blocks, for example, which are not objects at all).

This is an essential test for a closure:

def bar():
    x = 1
    def foo():
        print x
    return foo

x = 2
bar()()

If it prints 1, foo is a closure. If it prints 2, it is not.

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