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I saw some posts about this but I still can't find an answer.

This is how my server interacts with the client:

public void run () {
    try {
        //Read client request
        InputStream is = server.getInputStream();
        byte[] buff = new byte[1024];
        int i;
        ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        while ((i = is.read(buff, 0, buff.length)) != -1) {
            bos.write(buff, 0, i);
            System.out.println(i + " bytes readed ("+bos.size()+")");
        }
        is.close();
        is = null;
        //Do something with client request

        //write response
        OutputStream os = server.getOutputStream();
        os.write("server response".getBytes());
        os.flush();
        os.close();
        os = null;

    } catch (IOException ioe) {
        ioe.printStackTrace();
    }
}

And this is the client side:

public void run() {
        try {
            InetAddress serverAddr = null;
            serverAddr = InetAddress.getByName("10.0.2.2");
            socket = new Socket(serverAddr, 5000);

            //Send Request to the server
            OutputStream os = socket.getOutputStream();
            os.write(jsonRequest.toString().getBytes("UTF-8"));
            os.flush();
            os.close();
            os = null;

            //Read Server Response
            InputStream is = socket.getInputStream();
            byte[] buff = new byte[1024];
            int i;
            ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            while ((i = is.read(buff, 0, buff.length)) != -1) {
                bos.write(buff, 0, i);
                System.out.println(i + " bytes readed ("+bos.size()+")");
            }
            is.close();
            is = null;

            //Do something with server response

        } catch (UnknownHostException uhe) {
            sendCallbackError(uhe);
        } catch (IOException ioe) {
            sendCallbackError(ioe);
        }
    }

As you can see, the client connects and send a request. Server read that request then writes a response that the client will read.

The problem with this code is the OutputStream.close() in the client and InputStream.close() in the server. As stated in the Javadocs, closing the stream will close the Socket. The result is that when the client tries to read the server response, the Socket is already closed.

I've managed to overcome this by calling Socket.shutdownInput and Socket.shutdownOutput instead. However I am still thinking whether this is the proper way of doing it

As a note, closing the streams with close() when server writes the response or when the client reads it doesn't create problems (I would guess the closing is synchronized between client and server).

So my questions are:

  1. Is using the Socket shutdown methods a proper way?
  2. Can I keep closing the last streams with close() (when sending and reading response from server)
  3. Could it happen that closing with shutdown would keep some data in the buffer and wouldn't be sent?
share|improve this question
    
put socket.close() in a finally block. – Peter Lawrey Jul 11 '13 at 4:14
    
@PeterLawrey do you mean not closing the streams and close the socket instead? If yes, I guess I should close the socket in both ends, right? – momo Jul 11 '13 at 4:18
    
You should close the sockets, if you want to flush the output stream first you might want to close or flush it first. – Peter Lawrey Jul 11 '13 at 4:20
    
@PeterLawrey I am confused. Javadocs clearly says (and this code proves it) that the Socket is closed when the Stream is closed. Do you mean something like Norton said below: in a finally block close the streams and then close the socket? – momo Jul 11 '13 at 4:23
1  
You only need to close the stream if you have a BufferedOuptutStream and this has unsent data (in the buffer) If this is not the case, juts closing the socket is all you need. If you close the socket and there is unsent data, this will never be sent. – Peter Lawrey Jul 11 '13 at 4:47

You can do the following:

try{
}catch(){
}finally{
if(is!=null){
is.close();
}
if(os!=null){
os.close();
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a simplified example. The Streams are actually being created in different methods that are called from the run() method. So I really have no access to the variables unless I declare them as member variables of the Runnable class – momo Jul 11 '13 at 4:21
    
Tried your suggestion. It's not working for me because if the client's OutputStream is not closed/shutdown the server keeps reading eternally. Maybe I should send a termination sequence to finish the reading... – momo Jul 11 '13 at 4:33

The problem with this code is the OutputStream.close() in the client and InputStream.close() in the server. As stated in the Javadocs, closing the stream will close the Socket.

Correct but the InputStream in the server isn't connected directly to a Socket: it is connected to something you don't know anything about. You can close it with impunity, although again you don't need to close it at all. You can close the OutputStream in the server if you like: although, again, as it isn't connected directly to a Socket, it may or may not have any effect other than flushing.

To address your actual question, you don't need to close the output stream in the client, but you do need to send an appropriate Content-Length: header. That way the server knows how much to read from the client. If this is only a GET request the content-length may well be zero. You don't need to call shutdownOutput(), although I guess there is nothing to stop you, and calling shutdownInput() doesn't do anything to the network anyway so again there is no point to it.

share|improve this answer
    
while you are maybe right about the InputStream in the server, if I close it and then try to open the OutputStream, it will fail with a Socket Closed IOException. Regarding the Content-Length, I understand you mean reserving the first bytes of the byte array to specify the message length, right? I think that should be the best solution because the way I break the reading in the server (read() != -1) won't be triggered unless I close() the OutputStream in the server or call socket.shutdownOutput(). The latest is working just fine. – momo Jul 11 '13 at 9:55
    
(1) So don't close it then. Closing it or not has nothing to do with with your question. (2) No, I am referring to the HTTP Content-Length header. Look it up. – EJP Jul 11 '13 at 22:48
    
This is a plain socket connection sending JSON in plain old bytes, that's the only protocol implemented. I have no idea how an HTTP header could fit in this implementation... – momo Jul 12 '13 at 3:53

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