Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working along with Cocoa Programming For Mac OS X (a great book). One of the exercises the book gives is to build a simple to-do program. The UI has a table view, a text field to type in a new item and an "Add" button to add the new item to the table.

On the back end I have a controller that is the data source and delegate for my NSTableView. The controller also implements an IBAction method called by the "Add" button. It contains a NSMutableArray to hold the to do list items. When the button is clicked, the action method fires correctly and the new string gets added to the mutable array. However, my data source methods are not being called correctly. Here they be:

- (NSInteger)numberOfRowsInTableView:(NSTableView *)aTableView {
    NSLog(@"Calling numberOfRowsInTableView: %d", [todoList count]);
    return [todoList count];
}

- (id)tableView:(NSTableView *)aTableView
objectValueForTableColumn:(NSTableColumn *)aTableColumn
row:(NSInteger)rowIndex {
    NSLog(@"Returning %@ to be displayed", [todoList objectAtIndex:rowIndex]);
    return [todoList objectAtIndex:rowIndex];
}

Here is the rub. -numberOfRowsInTableView only gets called when the app first starts, not every time I add something new to the array. -objectValueForTableColumn never gets called at all. I assume this is because Cocoa is smart enough to not call this method when there is nothing to draw. Is there some method I need to call to let the table view know that its data source has changed, and it should redraw itself?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted
-[NSTableView reloadData];

(as a couple of good minutes with the NSTableView API reference would have told you.)

share|improve this answer
2  
I did put some effort into looking, just in the wrong place. I checked the Table View Programming Guide, NSTableViewDataSource API reference and NSTableViewDelegate API reference. It seems obvious when you know where it is already. –  Jergason Nov 18 '09 at 19:49
    
Fair enough. Good luck. –  Barry Wark Nov 18 '09 at 19:56
7  
Don't get me started on trying to find the method for a particular task when it might be spread out over (deity of your choice) only knows how many classes and protocols. It's the major weaknesses in the documentation. To actually use an unfamiliar class, you have to read the docs for the class, all the classes it inherits from and all the protocols it inherits or uses. Wacky fun. –  TechZen Nov 18 '09 at 22:11
    
@TechZen Fair enough. There seems to be a disconnect between the topic guides and the API docs where the topic guides don't always lead you to the right API docs. –  Barry Wark Nov 18 '09 at 22:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.