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I've got some code that puts a line-through on a TR for deleted rows, but this means that my "Actions" column (that only has) buttons suffers. This is because there are individual spaces between the buttons, which wind up getting line-throughed as well.

After poking around on W3Schools, it boggles me why this example doesn't work:

<html>
  <head>
  <style type="text/css">

    tr {text-decoration:line-through}
  </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td>this needs to be line-throughed</td>
        <td style="text-decoration: none !important;">This shouldn't be line-throughed.</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>

How am I supposed to clear the line-through on child elements?

EDIT I've updated my example - the problem is that I do not want to take the style off the parent element, just a single child element.

share|improve this question
    
CSS doesn't work this way. h2 and tr are containers, so you can't change their style by changing the style of their children. See Zarembisty or Dmitri's answers for the normal way of doing this. –  Justin Johnson Nov 18 '09 at 20:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You shouldn't have to use important or inline styles for this. Try

h2 {text-decoration:line-through;}
h2 span {text-decoration: none; border: 1px solid black;}

EDIT

In that case with tr since yeah you applied text-decoration to it, you have to take text-decoration off the same element tr not td. Otherwise do:

tr td { text-decoration: whatever }

and then when needed

<td style="text-decoration: none;"></td>
share|improve this answer
    
I've clarified based on my example, but doing tr td applies it to all TDs, where I only need an individual one –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 19:57
    
...also, this example doesn't work lol –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 20:00
    
Good point, I should put the line-through on the tds –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 20:02
    
I accepted this answer because it kept my style set at the TR, which is one of my design goals, where Zarembisty's answer is definitely applicable, but is set at the TD level –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 20:05

There was a similar question a little while back and according to that answer you can't do what you're trying to accomplish.

EDIT: Given your example, why not just apply the line-through to TD elements individually

<html>
  <head>
  <style type="text/css">

    td.deleted {text-decoration:line-through}
  </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td class="deleted">this needs to be line-throughed</td>
        <td>This shouldn't be line-throughed.</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
egads, I hope the answer isn't "lawl you're up a creek without a paddle" –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 20:01
    
if in doubt go with the earlier (Dmitri wins) –  Marek Karbarz Nov 18 '09 at 20:04

The line-through is applied to the H2, so you have to take it off of the H2.

<html>
  <head>
  <style type="text/css">

    h2 {text-decoration:line-through}
    h2.alt { text-decoration: none; }
    h2.alt span { border: 1px solid black; }
  </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <h2>Line-through</h2>
    <h2 class="alt"><span>This is heading 2, and shouldn't be line-throughed.</span></h2>
  </body>
</html>

(Viewable here: http://jsbin.com/anopa/)

The child (span) cannot affect the style of the parent (h2), which is where the style is applied. You have to alter where the style was originally applied.

Edit: updated example

share|improve this answer
    
But that would defeat the purpose, since it's a child element I need it removed from, not the parent element. The parent element "needs" to have it (with current design) –  JustLoren Nov 18 '09 at 20:01

One way to fix this would be to change

tr {text-decoration:line-through}

to

tr td {text-decoration:line-through}

As a result, the line-through is on the individual table cell and not the whole row. This allows you to specify a different style on a single cell.

BTW, the issue doesn't seem to exist with the example code you've given on IE5.5+. In FF3.5, however, the example behaves as you've explained. I'm not sure which is the actual correct behavior.

share|improve this answer

Try This

<html>
  <head>
  <style type="text/css">

    tr td {text-decoration:line-through;}
    tr td.noline { text-decoration:none;}

  </style>
  </head>

  <body>
    <table>
      <tr>
        <td>this needs to be line-throughed</td>
        <td class="noline">This shouldn't be line-throughed.</td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>
</html>

Notice that the style is "tr td" for both.

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