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I want to print cities that fulfill 3 conditions: capital, clean and big.

Input:

London is a big city
London is a capital
London is a clean city
Ohio is a big city
Sydney is a big city
Sydney is a clean city
Canberra is a capital
Canberra is a big city
Canberra is a clean city
NewYork is a big city
NewYork is a clean city

Output:

London
Canberra

I need only those names which fulfill all the 3 conditions: capital, clean and big.

I tried to cut the first column in separate file then for each city do grep name file|wc -l and take only those which have count more than 3. How can this be done in Unix using sed or awk.

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closed as off-topic by NPE, David Z, Steven Penny, talonmies, anubhava Jul 11 '13 at 7:08

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – NPE, David Z, Steven Penny, talonmies, anubhava
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Please show us the code you have tried. – mishik Jul 11 '13 at 5:52
    
what have I tried is... Cut the first column in separate file then for each city do grep name file|wc -l and take only those which have count more than 3 – user2571235 Jul 11 '13 at 6:06
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. People will help you with problems with your code; people won't simply write the code for you. Please edit what you've tried so far into the question. Note that running cut on the first column throws away the information about which type of city it is. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 11 '13 at 6:07
    
Of the tools you list (grep, sed, cut, awk), I think awk is the tool of choice for this problem. You need three separate lists of cities: those which are clean, those which are big, and those which are a capital city. When you've read all the data, you can cycle through, say, all the big cities, and for each big city, check whether it appears in the list of capital cities and the list of clean cities, printing it if it does. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 11 '13 at 6:13
2  
London is clean and Canberra big? OMG! Where have you been, dear ? – Endoro Jul 11 '13 at 7:48

Just for fun.

The shell hacker's solution:

sort -u input.txt | cut -d' ' -f1 | uniq -dc | egrep '^\s+3\s'

The perl hacker's solution:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use constant {
    CAPITAL => 1,
    CLEAN   => 2,
    BIG     => 4,
};
my %table;

while(<>)
{
    print STDERR "Unparsed: $_" unless m/^(\w+)\s+is a\s+((big city)|(clean city)|(capital))\s*$/gio;

    $table{$1} |= defined($3) * BIG +
                  defined($4) * CLEAN +
                  defined($5) * CAPITAL;
}

while (my ($k,$v) = each %table)
{
    print "$k\n" if (CAPITAL+CLEAN+BIG) == $v;
}
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