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Let's suppose I have such a structure of classes: base class Object, which is a parent class for Bool, Int, Float, Bytes and Unicode classes. Before I had some functions like Bool cast_bool() const, Int cast_int() const, etc. as virtual functions in the Object class and in all child classes I've implemented these functions separately.

It seems that a better solution is to implement template <typename TYPE> TYPE cast() const function instead. However, since C++ prohibits virtual template functions I don't know how can I complete this task. What I need is to provide template <typename TYPE> TYPE cast() const for Object and its childs. Generic Object::cast<TYPE>() const will just throw CastError; then for every type like Bool, Int, etc. I'll implement functions like Bool::cast<Bool>() const, Int::cast<Bool>() const, etc. I'm even planning to add cast to builtin objects, though now I just overload operator bool() const, operator signed short() const, etc. If there is no implementation, template must switch to its generic form from Object class, just throwing an error. Is there a way to do it (perhaps I need to use some pattern)? Or it is easier to leave functions like Int cast_int() const? Thanks in advance!

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If your cast from data is stored in the base class, there is no reason why you can't add a templated member function to the same base class. Then have child classes call that. Or maybe I'm missunderstanding the question. –  Waldermort Jul 11 '13 at 6:42

5 Answers 5

What you are doing doesn't sound like a very good idea, C++ is not Java or C#... nevertheless you could do it like this:

class Object
{
public:

     template<typename T>
     T& cast()
     {
          return cast_impl(std::declval<T>());
     }

private:
     virtual bool& cast_impl(bool&){ throw std::bad_cast(); }
     virtual int& cast_impl(int&){ throw std::bad_cast(); }
};

class Boolean : public Object
{
    bool value_;
public:

private:
     bool& cast_impl(bool) override
     { 
         return value_;
     }
};
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Add an intermediate class like in the example below or just use dynamic_cast without any template methods.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

template <class> class ObjectImpl;

class Object
{
public:
    virtual ~Object() {}

    template <class T>
    T cast() const
    {
        if (auto obj = dynamic_cast<const ObjectImpl<T>*>(this))
        {
            return obj->cast();
        }
        else
        {
            throw std::string("cast error");
        }
    }
};

template <class T>
class ObjectImpl : public Object
{
public:
    virtual T cast() const = 0;
};

class Bool : public ObjectImpl<bool>
{
public:
    bool cast() const override { return true; }
};
class Float : public ObjectImpl<float>
{
public:
    float cast() const  override { return 12.34f; }
};

int main()
{
    Object* obj = new Float;

    cout << obj->cast<float>() << endl;

    try
    {
        cout << obj->cast<bool>() << endl;
    }
    catch (std::string e)
    {
        cout << e << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
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You can keep a set of flags

enum Castablity{
    intable    = 0x1,
    floatable  = 0x2,
    doubleable = 0x4,
    bytable    = 0x8,
    stringable = 0x10,
    unicodable = 0x20,
};

and keep a virtual int castable() const function in each of these class, e.g. your Int::castable() will return intable | floatable | doublable | stringable . and YOu need to have another templated map that takes an Castablity enum value and return target type in typedef .

template <typename T>
struct type_value;

template <enum v>
struct value_type;

template <>
struct type_value<Int>{
    enum {value = intable;}
};
template <>
struct value_type<intable>{
    typedef Int data_type;
};

and a global cast function

template <typename T, typename U>
U cast(const T& original){
    if(!original.castable(type_value<U>::value))
        //throw exception
    return detail::cast<U>(original.internal_data());
}

You can have a virtual method that takes an integer value instead of taking types at compile time. or you can have an internal structure to store all types of object values. something like boost::any

and you can write another specialization in detail namespace that will convert that internal type to target type

namespace detail{
  template <typename T>
  /// you may have specialization for different types
  struct casting_helper{
    static T cast(const internal_type& data){

    }
  }
  template <typename T>
  T cast(const internal_data& data){
      return casting_helper<T>::cast(data);
  }
}
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Another alternative if you are fine with runtime casts.

class Object
{
public:

     template<typename T>
     T& cast()
     {
          return *dynamic_cast<T*>(get());
     }

private:
     virtual void* get() = 0;
};

class Boolean : public Object
{
    bool value_;
public:

private:
    void* get() override
    {
        return &value_;
    }
}
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You can create a type wrapper for the object.

struct TypeWrapperBase
{
protected:
    static int m_counter;
};

int TypeWrapperBase::m_counter = 0;

template<typename T>
struct TypeWrapper:
    TypeWrapperBase
{
    static int m_type;
protected:
    static int AllocateType()
    {
        m_counter++;
        return m
    }
public:
    static int GetType()
    {
        return m_type;
    }   
};

template<typename T>
int TypeWrapper<T>::m_type = TypeWrapperBase::m_counter++;

void main()
{
    std::cout << TypeWrapper<int>::GetType() << std::endl;   // prints 0
    std::cout << TypeWrapper<float>::GetType() << std::endl;  // prints 1
    std::cout << TypeWrapper<bool>::GetType() << std::endl; // prints 2
}

Now this way you can simulate an any object by comparing el1.GetType() with el2.GetType(). If it's equal you can perform a static cast

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