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I am a front end developer working on a small social network. Currently, we are using SubSonic and it has satisfied all of our needs. Since Microsft has stopped supporting LINQ, I want to know how this will affect the development of SubSonic if at all. Is there any reason to move to ADO.net?

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Microsoft stopped supporting LINQ? –  Omar Nov 18 '09 at 20:03
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LINQ is very much alive, and LINQ to SQL is still very popular and is not being dropped, as such. –  GraemeF Nov 18 '09 at 20:05
    
Where the heck did you get that idea from?? This is - plain and simple - NOT TRUE - never has been. Period. –  marc_s Nov 18 '09 at 20:39
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If Microsoft stops support for LINQ I'll finally learn LISP and install Linux... seriously ;-) –  queen3 Nov 18 '09 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

Microsoft has not stopped supporting LINQ. I think you might be referring to LINQ to SQL, which is a completely different animal. If you're developing with SubSonic, you should have no issue with LINQ to SQL support.

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Haha, Rob will be happy to know this.... –  Ken Henderson Nov 18 '09 at 20:07
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And even if one does refer to Linq to SQL they have not stopped supporting it, its just that they're focusing their development efforts on Entity Framework –  Murph Nov 18 '09 at 20:07
    
@Murph Absolutely. –  Joseph Nov 18 '09 at 20:08

LINQ is in no way going to stop being supported.

If you're referring to LINQ to SQL, you'd also be mis-informed. LINQ to SQL is indeed evident in .NET 4.0 / Visual Studio 2010.

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I would also like to add: Linq and Linq-to-sql and two VERY different things.

I find it so frustrating that so many people don't understand this

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