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I see from this link that these two boundary matches are quite similar: \G and ^.

I have also seen the example of \G that they have shown at the end of the same link.

    Enter your regex: dog 
Enter input string to search: dog dog
I found the text "dog" starting at index 0 and ending at index 3.
I found the text "dog" starting at index 4 and ending at index 7.

Enter your regex: \Gdog 
Enter input string to search: dog dog
I found the text "dog" starting at index 0 and ending at index 3.

It's very clear compared with no boundary matchers, however what about:

Enter your regex: \Gdog 
Enter input string to search: dog dog
I found the text "dog" starting at index 0 and ending at index 3.

vs

Enter your regex: ^dog 
Enter input string to search: dog dog
I found the text "dog" starting at index 0 and ending at index 3.

What is the subtle difference between the 2?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This explains about \G

https://forums.oracle.com/thread/1255361

\G start its searches from the start of the string and keep searching after the first match is ended.

^ will only give one result as the search ends if the match is found at the beginning of the search

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It is as described in the javadocs:

\G - The end of the previous match

^ - The beginning of a line

Try the sentences like dog, dogdog, dogdogdog, etc. with both \G and \^. \G will find matches for the dog's in different positions while ^ will only find the first one.

As for you query why ^ and \G are similar for the sentence dog dog. It is because the first match for \G will be from index 0 to 3 the second match will start from index 3 onwards which is <space>dog and not dog thus the second match fails.

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