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Can I encapsulate a private field through an automatic property in C#? When i use C# properties i surely can encapsulate private fields like.

private string owner;
public string Owner
{
  get { return owner; }
  set { owner=value;}
}

What happens when i use an automatic property?

public string Owner { get; set; }

That way I only interact with the property itself, right? Is there any way to use an automatic property to encapsulate a private field? How does it work?

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what is your goal? –  Guru Stron Jul 11 '13 at 9:14
    
if you want to reduce typing then create private field and press 'ctrl+r' and 'ctrl+e' –  Guru Stron Jul 11 '13 at 9:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there any way to use an automatic property to encapsulate a private field?

Yes; that is exactly what an automatically implemented property is. Simply: the compiler declares the field for you - you never see the field directly. Perhaps the real question here should be:

If I use an automatically implemented property, can I access the underlying field directly?

To which the answer is: no; just access the property instead. After JIT inlining, you'll never know the difference anyway.

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If the member is of a structure type, or if code would need to pass it as a ref parameter to anything, the differences could be significant. –  supercat Jul 18 '13 at 21:02

No there is way to do that what you're asking for.

Automatic property defines a field, but it's hidden and created at compile time.

If issue is a typing and you're using Visual Studio :

just type inside editor propfull and make double tap on TAB, Visual Studio will automatically create a property and a field encapsulatd inside it with the name specified by you.

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the private field is created at compile time with a unique name, it's being used behind the scenes. the automatic properties are implemented so that your type interface would not change if you, for example add validation on the setter. in your class you should then reference the public property. that way when you add the validation to a setter, your class would not have special privileges as to pass the validation process (if one would be implemented).

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the default property in C# compiles to a private field with a public getter and setter.

this

public string Name{get;set;}

compiles to this:

private string name
public string Name
{
    get
    {
        return name;
    }
    set
    {
        name = value;
    }
}

(actually it doesnt, the variable names are different and it uses accessor/mutators, but essentially they are the same thing)

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There is a difference in the way an object is presented to the outside world, depending upon whether a value is exposed as:

    public string Owner { get; set; }

which is a property, or

    public string Owner;

which is a field.

If you have a private variable, there is no need for automatic properties as it doesn't matter to you if it's a field or a property inside your class. If you do later want to expose it externally, that's when you start having code like:

    private string myPrivateValue;

    public string myPrivateValueAsProperty {
        get { return myPrivateValue; }
        set { myPrivateValue = value; }
    }
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Both piece of code you have given are nothing but same and will have same effect in your case. However using a local private property or rather call it property with backing fields can be used to give a default value.

private string owner = "I am the Owner";
public string Owner
{
  get { return owner; }
  set { owner=value;}
}

Also, backing fields are used if want to do any validations inside.

private string owner = "I am the Owner";
public string Owner
{
  get { return owner; }
  set 
  { 
        if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
              owner=value;
  }
}

They are also used for notifying property sometimes.

private string owner = "I am the Owner";
public string Owner
{
  get { return owner; }
  set 
  { 
       owner=value;
       NotifyPropertyChanges("Owner");
  }
}

Hope it helps.

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