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Why does re-opening a nested module give different results depending on the syntax used? For example, this works fine:

module A
  module E
  end
end
module A
  module E
    def E.e
    end
  end
end

But this:

module A
  module E
  end
end
module A::E
  def E.e
  end
end

gives the error:

reopen.rb:6:in `<module:E>': uninitialized constant A::E::E (NameError)
from reopen.rb:5:in `<main>'

(Before someone points this out, a workaround is to use self instead of the module name when defining E.e, but that's not really the point of this post.)

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2  
So, what's the question? –  joonty Jul 11 '13 at 10:02
    
Fair point - rephrased. –  Glyn Normington Jul 11 '13 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The module keyword sets a namespace context that is checked for references to existing names of Modules. These namespaces are then searched inner-to-outer to resolve references to Module (and Class) names.

In your first example, it looks like you may need to define E.e inside module E block, but in fact you don't:

module A
  module E
  end
end
module A
  def E.e
  end
end

What happens in both your examples is that Ruby looks at the current namespace, and tries <namespace>::E as a module name. So in both examples, the first thing it checks is in fact A::E::E which does not exist. Then it falls back to the next context. Which is where the examples differ: In the first example it is A::E which is valid, in the second example, it is just E which is not. The error that it then throws relates to the first name it checked.

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1  
Interesting. IMO module A::E creating a non-nested context with a "nested" name is a bug. If it was equivalent to: module A module E ... I'd say that would be much closer to normal intuition about namespaces. –  Glyn Normington Jul 11 '13 at 13:52
    
Yes, it always creates a single context, within the module block. It is at least self-consistent in that respect. I cannot see any reason why it couldn't be made to work another way, except for historical reasons - there may even be code out there that relies on the current behaviour - where E and A::E are both defined for instance. –  Neil Slater Jul 11 '13 at 14:15
    
Fair enough. Perhaps raising the issue here might cause it to percolate into a future version of Ruby. –  Glyn Normington Jul 12 '13 at 10:29

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