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Using irb, we can list methods for particular object by doing following:

"Name".methods

But if I want to know how many parameters are needed for a particular method, how can I achieve this? I mean is there any way (by hitting some command on irb), we can get number of parameters for particular method (instead of referring to docs)?

.methods returns only method names, not list of parameters for method.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can use the method Method#arity:

"string".method(:strip).arity
# => 0

From the Ruby documentation:

Returns an indication of the number of arguments accepted by a method. Returns a nonnegative integer for methods that take a fixed number of arguments. For Ruby methods that take a variable number of arguments, returns -n-1, where n is the number of required arguments. For methods written in C, returns -1 if the call takes a variable number of arguments.

So, for example:

# Variable number of arguments, one is required
def foo(a, *b); end
method(:foo).arity
# => -2

# Variable number of arguments, none required
def bar(*a); end
method(:bar).arity
# => -1

# Accepts no argument, implemented in C
"0".method(:to_f).arity
# => 0

# Variable number of arguments (0 or 1), implemented in C
"0".method(:to_i).arity
# => -1


Update I've just discovered the exitence of Method#parameters, it could be quite useful:

def foo(a, *b); end
method(:foo).parameters
# => [[:req, :a], [:rest, :b]] 
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Thanks you!!!!! –  TDHM Jul 11 '13 at 13:14

You can use arity

Returns an indication of the number of arguments accepted by a method. Returns a nonnegative integer for methods that take a fixed number of arguments. For Ruby methods that take a variable number of arguments, returns -n-1, where n is the number of required arguments. For methods written in C, returns -1 if the call takes a variable number of arguments.

Example from ruby-doc

class C
  def one;    end
  def two(a); end
  def three(*a);  end
  def four(a, b); end
  def five(a, b, *c);    end
  def six(a, b, *c, &d); end
end

c = C.new
c.method(:one).arity     #=> 0 
c.method(:two).arity     #=> 1
c.method(:three).arity   #=> -1
c.method(:four).arity    #=> 2
c.method(:five).arity    #=> -3
c.method(:six).arity     #=> -3
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