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My task is to make a trigger which will fire when our programmers create, alter, replace or delete triggers in database. It must log their changes to 2 datatables which I made similar to SYS.trigger$ table and added some extra info about user who made changes to them. I copied the principles of logging from already existing audit capability in ERP-system named Galaktika or Galaxy to be simple. However, I encountered a well-famous problem ORA-04089: no one can create triggers on system tables and stuck with it.

Now I'm looking for a way to gently modify my trigger according to database rules. Here is the original code:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER MRK_AlTrigger$
   BEFORE DELETE OR INSERT OR UPDATE
   ON SYS.TRIGGER$
   REFERENCING NEW AS New OLD AS Old
   FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE
   Log_Rec   MRK_TRIGGERS_LOG_HEADER.NREC%TYPE;
BEGIN
   INSERT INTO MRK_TRIGGERS_LOG_HEADER (DATEOFCHANGE,
                                            USERCODE,
                                            OPERATION,
                                            OBJ#)
    VALUES (
              SYSDATE,
              UID,
              CASE
                 WHEN INSERTING THEN 0
                 WHEN UPDATING THEN 1
                 WHEN DELETING THEN 2
              END,
              CASE
                 WHEN INSERTING OR UPDATING THEN :new.OBJ#
                 ELSE :old.OBJ#
              END)
     RETURNING NRec
          INTO Log_Rec;

   IF INSERTING OR UPDATING
   THEN
      INSERT INTO MRK_TRIGGERS_LOG_SPECIF (LOGLINK,
                                               OBJ#,
                                               TYPE#,
                                               UPDATE$,
                                               INSERT$,
                                               DELETE$,
                                               BASEOBJECT,
                                               REFOLDNAME,
                                               REFNEWNAME,
                                               DEFINITION,
                                               WHENCLAUSE,
                                               ACTION#,
                                               ACTIONSIZE,
                                               ENABLED,
                                               PROPERTY,
                                               SYS_EVTS,
                                               NTTRIGCOL,
                                               NTTRIGATT,
                                               REFPRTNAME,
                                               ACTIONLINENO)
       VALUES (Log_Rec,
               :new.OBJ#,
               :new.TYPE#,
               :new.UPDATE$,
               :new.INSERT$,
               :new.DELETE$,
               :new.BASEOBJECT,
               :new.REFOLDNAME,
               :new.REFNEWNAME,
               :new.DEFINITION,
               :new.WHENCLAUSE,
               :new.ACTION#,
               :new.ACTIONSIZE,
               :new.ENABLED,
               :new.PROPERTY,
               :new.SYS_EVTS,
               :new.NTTRIGCOL,
               :new.NTTRIGATT,
               :new.REFPRTNAME,
               :new.ACTIONLINENO);
   END IF;
EXCEPTION
   WHEN OTHERS
   THEN
      -- Consider logging the error and then re-raise
      RAISE;
END MRK_AlTrigger$;
/

I can also provide MRK_TRIGGERS_LOG_HEADER and MRK_TRIGGERS_LOG_SPECIF DDL, but think it is not necessary. So to make summary, here are the questions I have:

  1. How do I modify the above source to the syntax CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER ON DATABASE?
  2. Am I inventing a wheel doing this? Is there any common way to do such things? (I noticed that some tables have logging option, but consider it is for debugging purposes)

Any help will be appreciated!

UPD: I came to decision (thanks to APC) that it is better to hold different versions of code in source control and record only revision number in DB, but dream about doing this automatically.

share|improve this question
1  
have you looked into DDL auditing ? –  haki Jul 11 '13 at 12:18
    
Thanks! I will take a look on it. –  Danatela Jul 12 '13 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"We despaired to appeal to our programmers' neatness so my boss requires that there must be strong and automatic way to log changes. And to revert them quickly if we need."

In other words, you want a technical fix for what is a political problem. This does not work. However, if you have your boss's support you can sort it out. But it will get messy.

I have been on both sides of this fence, having worked as developer and development DBA. I know from bitter experience how bad it can be if the development database - schemas, configuration parameters, reference data, etc - are not kept under control. Your developers will feel like they are flying right now, but I guarantee you they are not tracking all the changes they make in script form . So their changes are not reversible or repeatable, and when the project reaches UAT the deployment will most likely be a fiasco (buy me a beer and I'll tell you some stories).

So what to do?

Privileged access

Revoke access to SYSDBA accounts and application schema accounts from developers. Apart from anything else you may find parts of the application start to rely on privileged accesses and/or hard-coded passwords, and those are Bad Things; you don't want to include those breaches in Production.

As your developers have got accustomed to having such access this will be highly unpopular. Which is why you need your boss's support. You also must have a replacement approach in place, so leave this action until last. But make no mistake, this is the endgame.

Source control

Database schemas are software too. They are built out of programs, just like the rest of the application, only the source code is DDL and DML scripts not C# or Java. These scripts can be controlled in SVN as with any other source code.

How to organise it in source control? That can be tricky. So recognise that you have three categories of scripts:

  1. Schema scripts which deploy objects
  2. Configuration scripts which insert reference data, manage system parameters, etc
  3. Build scripts which call the other scripts in the right order

Managing the schema scripts is the hardest thing to get right. I suggest you use separate scripts for each object. Also, have separate scripts for table, indexes and constraints. This means you can build all the tables without needing to arrange them in dependency order.

Handling change

The temptation will be to just control a CREATE TABLE statement (or whatever). This is a mistake. In actuality changes to the schema are just as likely to add, drop or modify columns as to introduce totally new objects. Store a CREATE TABLE statement as a baseline, then manage subsequent changes as ALTER TABLE statements.

One file for CREATE TABLE and subsequent ALTER TABLE commands, or separate ones? I'm comfortable having one script: I don't mind if a CREATE TABLE statement fails when I'm expecting the table to already be there. But this can be confusing if others will be running the scripts in say Production. So have a baseline script then separate scripts for applying changes. One alter script per object per time-box is a good compromise.

Changes from developers consist of

  • alter table script(s) to apply the change
  • a mirrored alter table script(s) to reverse the change
  • other scripts, e.g. DML
  • change reference number (which they will use in SVN)

Because you're introducing this late in the day, you'll need to be diplomatic. So make the change process light and easy to use. Also make sure you check and run the scripts as soon as possible. If you're responsive and do things quickly enough the developers won't chafe under the restricted access.

Getting to there

First of all you need to establish a baseline. Something like DBMS_METADATA will give you CREATE statements for all current objects. You need to organise them in SVN and write the build scripts. Create a toy database and get this right.

This may take some time, so remember to refresh the DDL scripts so they reflect the latest statement. If you have access to a schema comparison tool that would be very handy right now.

Next, sort out the configuration. Hopefully you already know tables contain reference data, otherwise ask the developers.

In your toy database practice zapping the database and building it from scratch. You can use something like Ant or Hudson to automate this if you're feeling adventurous, but at the very least you need some shell scripts to get a build out of SVN.

Making the transition

This is the big one. Announce the new regime to the developers. Get your boss to attend the meeting. Remind the developers to inform you of any changes they make to the database.

That night:

  1. Take a full export with Data Pump
  2. Drop all the application schemas.
  3. Build the application from SVN
  4. Reload the data - but not the data structures - with Data Pump
  5. Hopefully you won't have any structural issues; but if the developer has made changes without telling you you'll know - and they won't have any data in the table.
  6. Make sure you revoke the SYSDBA access as soon as possible.

The developers will need access to a set of schemas so they can write the ALTER scripts. In the developers don't have local personal databases or private schemas to test things I suggest you let them have access to that toy database to test change scripts. Alternatively you can let them keep the application owner access, because you'll be repeating the Trash'n'Rebuild exercise on a regular basis. Once they get used to the idea that they will lose any changes they don't tell you about they will knuckle down and start Doing The Right Thing.

Last word

Obviously this is a lot of vague windbaggery, lacking in solid detail. But that's politics for you.

Postscript

I was at a UKOUG event yesterday, and attended a session by a couple of smart chaps from Regdate. They have a product Source Control for Oracle which provides an interface between (say) SVN and the database. It takes a rather different approach from what I outlined above. But their approach is a sound one. Their tool automates a lot of things, and I think it might help you a lot in your current situation. I must stress that I haven't actually used this product but I think you should check it out - there's a 28 day free trial. Of course, if you don't have any money to spend then this won't help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this turns my ideas about development head over heels... or vice-versa. I accept this, because it is obviously right way, but Galaxy is... too specific system to make changes as proposed. I will write my own answer when I develop solution the way I like. You may consider it joke :) Anyway, thanks for the tips, especially for scripts location and handling, this is really useful. –  Danatela Jul 19 '13 at 3:16

you can find the desierd infos in the following trigger attributes

dictionary_obj_name 
dictionary_obj_owner
ora_sysevent

here is the simple ON DATABASE trigger

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER trigger_name
AFTER CREATE OR DROP  ON DATABASE
BEGIN
  IF dictionary_obj_type = 'TRIGGER'
  THEN 

    INSERT INTO log_table ( trg_name, trg_owner, trg_action) VALUES (dictionary_obj_name,dictionary_obj_owner, ora_sysevent);

  END IF;
END;
/ 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But I need also to log trigger bodies. I found that sql_txt function retrieves the whole query, but in very ugly form. How can I retrieve the query right? –  Danatela Jul 12 '13 at 3:27
    
@Danatela - it strikes me you are trying to solve the wrong problem. You need stronger restrictions on who has what access to the database and source control for your DDL scripts. –  APC Jul 13 '13 at 8:08
    
@APC, OK, I will research this way. –  Danatela Jul 15 '13 at 4:12
    
@APC, I'm familiar with SVN. Could you post your suggestion as an answer? We despaired to appeal to our programmers' neatness so my boss requires that there must be strong and automatic way to log changes. And to revert them quickly if we need. –  Danatela Jul 17 '13 at 7:58
    
@Danatela - please tell me your battleground is a development database and not production. –  APC Jul 17 '13 at 8:30

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