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00018 void *memcpy(void *dst, const void *src, size_t len)
00019 {
00020         size_t i;
00021 
00022         /*
00023          * memcpy does not support overlapping buffers, so always do it
00024          * forwards. (Don't change this without adjusting memmove.)
00025          *
00026          * For speedy copying, optimize the common case where both pointers
00027          * and the length are word-aligned, and copy word-at-a-time instead
00028          * of byte-at-a-time. Otherwise, copy by bytes.
00029          *
00030          * The alignment logic below should be portable. We rely on
00031          * the compiler to be reasonably intelligent about optimizing
00032          * the divides and modulos out. Fortunately, it is.
00033          */
00034 
00035         if ((uintptr_t)dst % sizeof(long) == 0 &&
00036             (uintptr_t)src % sizeof(long) == 0 &&
00037             len % sizeof(long) == 0) {
00038 
00039                 long *d = dst;
00040                 const long *s = src;
00041 
00042                 for (i=0; i<len/sizeof(long); i++) {
00043                         d[i] = s[i];
00044                 }
00045         }
00046         else {
00047                 char *d = dst;
00048                 const char *s = src;
00049 
00050                 for (i=0; i<len; i++) {
00051                         d[i] = s[i];
00052                 }
00053         }
00054 
00055         return dst;
00056 }

I was just going through an implementation of memcpy, to understand how it differs from using a loop. But I couldn't see any difference between using a loop rather than memcpy, as memcpy uses loop again internally to copy.

I couldn't understand if part they do for integers — i < len/sizeof(long). Why is this calculation required?

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1  
Where's this code come from? I've seen better optimized memcpy implementations... –  Maxime Jul 11 '13 at 11:08
    
@Maxime: how would you know: you don't even know the target processor (or compiler for that matter)! –  Olof Forshell Jul 11 '13 at 11:20
1  
@Angus, judging by your answer in stackoverflow.com/questions/11772553/… you seem to understand alignment. The long is a processor word and the address needs to be processor word aligned for a faster copy (most architectures do faster copies on aligned data). If you can't do it, then do it slowly, byte by byte. There are good answers below. –  nonsensickle Jul 11 '13 at 11:20
    
@OlofForshell because if not aligned and not a multiple of sizeof(long), it does a slow copy. It's easy to imagine to copy some aligned data with a size that is not equal to a multiple of sizeof(long) and finish with a slow copy. But you are true, for very specific target processors and use cases, this could be better. But this code aims to be portable and for the majority of cases, this could be improved. –  Maxime Jul 11 '13 at 11:35
    
Doesn't this function break aliasing rules (accessing memory via a long* that wasn't necessarily declared to be long) and therefore is undefined behavour? –  jcoder Jul 11 '13 at 12:04

4 Answers 4

I couldn't understand if part they do for integers. i < len/sizeof(long). Why is this calculation required ?

Because they are copying words, not individual bytes, in this case (as the comment says, it is an optimization - it requires less iterations and the CPU can handle word aligned data more efficiently).

len is the number of bytes to copy, and sizeof(long) is the size of a single word, so the number of elements to copy (means, loop iterations to execute) is len / sizeof(long).

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Word-aligned copy does not actually depend on CPU. It depends on how wired is the RAM. –  m0skit0 Jul 11 '13 at 11:17
    
@m0skit0 I would say it depends on the architecture - there are CPUs which can not even access data at non-aligned addresses, and there are ones which can access individual bytes at all addresses, but then these accesses might be much slower than accessing an aligned address –  Andreas Jul 11 '13 at 11:21
    
Yes I know. And precisely that's because on how wired is the RAM ;) Anyway, this is a detail. Your answer is correct. –  m0skit0 Jul 11 '13 at 11:37
1  
Probably should have said "architecture" in my answer instead of "CPU", as you did :) –  Andreas Jul 11 '13 at 11:45

to understand how it differs from using a loop. But I couldn't any difference of using a loop rather than memcpy, as memcpy uses loop again internally to copy

Well then it uses a loop. Maybe other implementations of libc doesn't do it like that. Anyway, what's the problem/question if it does use a loop? Also as you see it does more than a loop: it checks for alignment and performs a different kind of loop depending on the alignment.

I couldn't understand if part they do for integers. i < len/sizeof(long). Why is this calculation required ?

This is checking for memory word alignment. If the destination and source addresses are word-aligned, and the length copy is multiple of word-size, then it performs an aligned copy by word (long), which is faster than using bytes (char), not only because of the size, but also because most architectures do word-aligned copies much faster.

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what i do using loops is also word aligned(int -> 4 bytes). –  Angus Jul 12 '13 at 7:21
    
It's only worth doing it by 4 bytes if conditions apply. Otherwise word copy might be slower than byte copy. In fact in some architectures you can only copy memory zones do it if they are word aligned, otherwise it's an hardware exception (e.g. MIPS IIRC). –  m0skit0 Jul 12 '13 at 9:53
for (i=0; i<len/sizeof(long); i++) {
    d[i] = s[i];
}

In this for loop, every time a long is copied, there are a total size of len to copy, that's why it needs i<len/sizeof(long) as the condition to terminate the loop.

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len%sizeof(long) checks if you are trying to copy full- longs not a part of long.

if ((uintptr_t)dst % sizeof(long) == 0 &&
00036             (uintptr_t)src % sizeof(long) == 0 &&
00037             len % sizeof(long) == 0) {
00038 
00039                 long *d = dst;
00040                 const long *s = src;
00041 
00042                 for (i=0; i<len/sizeof(long); i++) {
00043                         d[i] = s[i];
00044                 }

checks for alignment and if true, copies fast(sizeof(long) bytes at a time).

 else {
00047                 char *d = dst;
00048                 const char *s = src;
00049 
00050                 for (i=0; i<len; i++) {
00051                         d[i] = s[i];
00052                 }

this is for the mis-aligned arrays (slow copy (1 byte at a time))

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