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I would like to know, is the scope of variables in when creating object with use of new operator in JavaScript?

function A(){
   this.a = 1; // instance property
}

function B(){ 
   this.a = 3; // instance property
}

case 1 : I understood this

// assign again prototype a property as 2 
A.prototype.a = 2 ;// prototype property

var obj = new A();

console.log( obj instanceof A );
console.log( obj.a == 1 ); 

case 2 : Changed A constructor into B reference

A.prototype.constructor =  B;
A.prototype.a = 2 ;// prototype property


var obj = new A();
console.log( obj instanceof B ); // false, as I expected
console.log( obj.a == 1 ); // still 1 why ?

case 3 : Inhertiance scope

A.prototype = new B();
A.prototype.a = 4 ;// prototype property


var obj = new A();
console.log( obj instanceof B ); // true , as I expected
console.log( obj.a == 1 ); // still 1 why ?

I have done some research, but could not find correct explanation for this .

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Prototype assigns/binds to the object before the objects initialization code is run

> function A() { console.log(this.a); this.a = 1; console.log(this.a); };
undefined
> new A();
undefined
1
A {a: 1}
> A.prototype.a = 2;
2
> new A();
2
1
A {a: 1, a: 2}

Inside the functions initialization code, before the prototype for A.a was assigned the first console.log was undefined. After prototype A.a was assigned the first consol.log correctly display it as (2) then this.a was assigned as 1 and the second console.log correctly displayed it as (1)

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thank you .. now I understood obj.a has value 1 –  rab Jul 12 '13 at 5:18
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The prototype chain is only looked up if an own property is not found on the object itself. In all your examples, there is an a property on the instances, defined in their constructor.

In case 2, if you don't expect obj to be an instance of B (and it's not, B is never invoked), why would you expect obj.a to be 1? It's exactly the same as your case 1, the only difference is that obj's [[Prototype]] have a misleading constructor property.

Case 3 is also the same thing. Basically, all your examples are the same, obj.a is defined at the time of construction, and shadows any same-named a property from the object's prototype chain.

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