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wanted to define custom routes into certain resources in addition to the ones Rails defines by default. To do this, the relevant parts of my routes.rb file look something like this:

resource :top, only: [:show]
scope module: :top do
  resource :reso, only: [:show]
end

get 'foo_reso' => 'top/reso#foo'
get 'bar_reso' => 'top/reso#bar'

As you can see, I only want routes to ResoController's methods show, foo, and bar. This works, as rake routes gives:

    reso GET    /reso(.:format)           top/reso#show
foo_reso GET    /foo_reso(.:format)       top/reso#foo
bar_reso GET    /bar_reso(.:format)       top/reso#bar

This works: clicking on a link in the application that takes you to the route foo_reso does result in a call ResoController#foo, and the subsequent display of the associated view.

However, I thought that the route definition was just slightly ugly, and instead of defining the routes explicity, wanted Rails to generate them automatically by telling it that the resource has two additional REST methods, foo and bar (while still restricting the standard methods by means of the only: argument).

I followed the advice in this answer, and changed routes.rb to this:

resource :top, only: [:show]
scope module: :top do
  resource :reso, only: [:show] do
    member do
      get :foo
      get :bar
    end
  end
end

Now, rake routes gives:

    reso GET    /reso(.:format)           top/reso#show
foo_reso GET    /reso/foo(.:format)       top/reso#foo
bar_reso GET    /reso/bar(.:format)       top/reso#bar

Note the difference between the paths in the two cases: while the helper path and the controller#action are the same, the path has changed from /foo_reso(.:format) to /reso/foo(.:format).

(I have all the resource names defined as uncountable in config/initializers/inflections.rb, so I don't get automatic pluralization of the names, because in my application, each controller is associated with a particular screen, not with a model, so pluralization doesn't fit the picture. In this app, the REST methods are really more like function calls than operations on a resource, which is why I need a different set than the standard.)

Now, clicking on a link to foo_reso in the application results in a Rails routing error page that says:

No route matches [GET] "/foo_reso"

Any ideas on what I could do to fix the situation, aside from just using my original solution?

Added on edit, 2013-07-12:

As I note in a comment below, according to the output of rake routes, the helper route foo_reso matches the controller and method I want to call, top/reso#foo, and when I manually enter the matching URL (reso/foo) into the URL bar, that works as intended. However, trying to open the route foo_reso from within the application results in a No route matches [GET] "/foo_reso". foo_reso_path and foo_reso_url result in the same error.

What on earth can the problem be? Surely not a bug in Rails?

Added on edit, 2013-07-22:

To make the use case a bit clearer, the idea is that when the user presses a "Reset" button on a page, the controller's reset method is called, which clears the page's inputs and outputs. I have been abstracting the question by changing the actual identifier reset to foo. (reso and and a couple of other identifiers are also the result of "obfuscation".) I'll continue to use the same translations for consistency's sake, but the code below should be clearer when you bear in mind that foo is actually reset. (bar is something else, but it doesn't matter, since the routing problem is the same.)

To answer Thong Kuah's and John Hinnegan's questions, this is how I use foo_reso_path. The relevant parts of file reso_controller:

class Top::ResoController < Top::ResoSuperController

  # GET /reso
  def show
    ...
    @reset_path = "foo_reso"
    ...
  end # show

  # GET /foo_reso
  def foo
    perform_foo_action
    redirect_to reso_path
  end
  ...
end

The relevant parts of file app/views/top/reso/show.html.erb:

<%= render partial: "top/resosuper_inputs", locals: { the_form_path: reso_path } %>
...
<input type="hidden" id="reset_path" name="reset_path" value="<%= @reset_path %>">

The form includes the partial _resosuper_inputs.html.erb, whose relevant parts are:

<!-- For using the "Reset" button. -->
<%= javascript_include_tag "my_reset_form.js" %>
<%= simple_form_for :filtering_criteria, url: the_form_path, method: :get do |f| %>
  ... inputs elided ...
  <%= f.button :submit, value: "Search" %>
  <%= f.button :submit, type: 'button', value: "Reset"), id: 'reset_button' %>
<% end %>

resosuper is the superclass of two different resources, but I don't think that has any effect on the case. Anyway, here's the Javascript file app/assets/javascripts/my_reset_form.js:

$(document).ready(function() {
  /* Hang functionality on the "Reset" button. */
  $('#reset_button').click(function () {
      var reset_path = $('#reset_path').val();
      window.open(reset_path, "_self")
  });
})

It's in jQuery, and as the comment says, makes the "Reset" button open the path whose value has been stored in the hidden input variable with the id reset_path. That value is what was given to the form by Top::ResoController in the variable @reset_path, namely, "foo_reso".

Keep in mind that all this worked fine when I defined foo_reso in routes.rb like this:

get 'foo_reso' => 'top/reso#foo'

Also keep in mind that replacing foo_reso with foo_reso_path or with foo_reso_url in the assignment statement in ResoController made no difference.

The places where I use foo_reso are in a controller and in a view, so that shouldn't be a problem.

share|improve this question
1  
Your previous endpoint URLs were incorrect. If they are actions on the "reso" resource, then they should be namespaced under that resource. If you were not limiting to just :show, you would URLs like /reso, /reso/123, /reso/new. That's how REST endpoint URLs work. –  Tim Dorr Jul 11 '13 at 15:28
    
OK, I guess a part of the trouble I'm having stems from what I said in the parenthetical remark: I'm trying to use the "resources" in a non-standard way. Basically, I want the routes to trigger method calls in a controller. In this case, the resources that controllers are associated with are not models, but rather screens. (The app is a GUI to a Java EE application that handles the actual resources.) –  Teemu Leisti Jul 11 '13 at 15:38
    
I think you're getting a little lost in the weeds on translating this over from the Java space. Your controller can worry about translating your URL over to some resource on the Java app. The controller method that would have been called from the routes listing is "top/reso#foo", which translates to Top::Reso.foo in your controller. Every member you add will work like that. –  Tim Dorr Jul 11 '13 at 18:48
    
As an example, if you have screens for adding widgets to a user and for getting a report on the user's widgets, you might have members on the :user resource for :addwidgets and :widgetreports. That will give you URLs like /user/123/addwidgets and /user/123/widgetreports, that go to UserController.addwidgets and UserController.widgetreports. And inside those methods in the controller, you can call over to the Java app. –  Tim Dorr Jul 11 '13 at 18:50
    
Actually, what my Ruby code is doing is what you suggested: foo, bar, etc. are not Java classes or Java resources; rather, they are Reso functions that construct REST calls to the Java code, based on user input to forms in the screen associated with ResoController. My problem is that when I try to make foo into a REST method, the route foo_reso fails, even though rake routes shows that it matches the controller and action I want (top/reso#foo), and even though when I type into the URL bar the URI (/reso/foo) that rake routes gives for it, it works as intended. –  Teemu Leisti Jul 12 '13 at 11:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

As posted in the description, here is the "usage".

# GET /reso
def show
...
  @reset_path = "foo_reso"
...
end # show

However, all the above is doing is just setting the @reset_path instance variable into a literal string `"foo_reso" (which coincidentally matches the old route)

What the poster really wants is :

 @reset_path = foo_reso_path

which will generate the right path /reso/foo into the instance variable @reset_path

Sidenote: The poster has done all the right things here to debug route problems. Most of the time, you can trust rake routes. Checking that one can access the route directly is good, and so is checking the usage of the route helper is correct too is crucial

share|improve this answer

Short answer: There is no automatic way in Rails to do so.

The reason is that RESTul URL relies basically on the format /controller/action. Meaning if your controller ResoController has 3 methods show, foo, and bar, a correct restful implementation will result in the URLS:

/reso
/reso/foo
/reso/bar

Rails can help you do achieve this, and the solution is using members in your routes, exactly the way you described in your question.

Using URLs such as /foo_reso or /bar_reso - in other words /action_controller is not Rails standard, and Rails base philosophy is "convention over configuration". So if you really need those you must declare them by hand

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, as I just found out, there is an automatic way to define paths to resources using custom REST methods. You're correct in that you can't define an URL such as /foo_reso, but defining a custom REST method foo on resource reso does automatically define a path foo_reso, which is then translated into the URL /reso/foo, whose invocation is converted into a call on the method ResoController#foo -- provided I define reso as an uncountable in config/initializers/inflections.rb; if not, substitute resos and ResosController as needed. –  Teemu Leisti Jul 22 '13 at 12:17
    
Well yes, that's exactly what I wrote /reso/foo = RESTful can be done automaticaly --- /foo_reso = not RESTful must be done manually –  Benjamin Sinclaire Jul 22 '13 at 23:01
    
Again, you're correct if you mean the URL /foo_reso, but I wanted the named route foo_reso to work "automatically", after having defined a custom REST method foo on resource reso, and this is what I (finally) accomplished. (I've used the term "path" inconsistently in my question and comments; for instance, I wrote "path" in the comment above when I should have said "named route", so this exchange might be due to me mangling the terminology.) –  Teemu Leisti Jul 23 '13 at 7:44
    
Actually, the Rails Routing from the Outside In guide calls them "route helpers" instead. So, when you command rake routes, you get three columns: route helpers, URLs, and controller#actions. –  Teemu Leisti Jul 23 '13 at 7:51
    
Did you try as:? in your route file get :foo, as: 'reset' and see the output of rake routes –  Benjamin Sinclaire Jul 23 '13 at 8:33

OK, I found out the problem. As often turns out to be the case after digging into a seemingly mysterious bug, the solution was very simple. My reso_controller.rb was:

class Top::ResoController < Top::ResoSuperController

# GET /reso
def show
  ...
  @reset_path = "foo_reso"
  ...
end # show

I replaced the assignment line by this:

  @reset_path = foo_reso_path

without quotes around foo_reso_path. Now the "Reset" button works as intended.

In summary, the following don't work:

  @reset_path = "foo_reso"
  @reset_path = "foo_reso_path"
  @reset_path = "foo_reso_url"
  @reset_path = foo_reso

And the following do work:

  @reset_path = foo_reso_path
  @reset_path = foo_reso_url

Don't I feel silly now. Sorry for the waste of time.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was just going to say that :) A string is not equal to a route helper method –  Thong Kuah Jul 23 '13 at 3:32
    
If you were just about to say it, submit it as an answer, and I'll award you the bounty. –  Teemu Leisti Jul 23 '13 at 12:12
    
ok, if you offer it :) –  Thong Kuah Jul 23 '13 at 12:22

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