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In one of my application there is a piece of code that retrieve information from a data.table object depending on values in another.

# say this table contains customers details
dt <- data.table(id=LETTERS[1:4],
                 start=seq(as.Date("2010-01-01"), as.Date("2010-04-01"), "month"),
                 end=seq(as.Date("2010-01-01"), as.Date("2010-04-01"), "month") + c(6,8,10,5),
                 key="id")

# this one has some historical details
dt1 <- data.table(id=rep(LETTERS[1:4], each=120),
                  date=seq(as.Date("2010-01-01"), as.Date("2010-04-30"), "day"),
                  var=rnorm(120),
                  key="id,date")

# and here I finally retrieve my historical information based one customer detail
#
library(data.table)

myfunc <- function(x) {
  # some code
  period <- seq(x$start, x$end, "day")
  dt1[.(x$id, period)][, mean(var)]
  # some code
}

to get the result for all I use adply

library(plyr)
library(microbenchmark)
> adply(dt, 1, myfunc)
   id      start        end         V1
1:  A 2010-01-01 2010-01-07  0.3143536
2:  B 2010-02-01 2010-02-09 -0.5796084
3:  C 2010-03-01 2010-03-11  0.1171404
4:  D 2010-04-01 2010-04-06  0.2384237

> microbenchmark(adply(dt, 1, myfunc))
Unit: milliseconds
                 expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
 adply(dt, 1, myfunc) 8.812486 8.998338 9.105776 9.223637 88.14057   100

Do you know a way to avoid the adply call and do the above in one data.table statement? Or anyway a faster method? (title edit suggestion more than welcome, I couldn't think a better one, thanks)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a great spot to use the roll argument of data.table:

setkey(dt1, id, date)
setkey(dt, id, start)

dt[dt1, roll = TRUE][end >= start,
   list(start = start[1], end = end[1], result = mean(var)), by = id]

# benchmark
microbenchmark(OP    = adply(dt, 1, myfunc),
               Frank = dt[dt1[as.list(dt[,seq.Date(start,end,"day"),by="id"])][,mean(var),by=id]],
               eddi  = dt[dt1, roll = TRUE][end >= start,list(start = start[1], end = end[1], result = mean(var)), by = id])
#Unit: milliseconds
#  expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#    OP 24.436126 29.184786 30.853094 32.493521 50.898664   100
# Frank  9.115676 11.303691 12.081000 13.122753 28.370415   100
#  eddi  5.336315  6.323643  6.771898  7.497285  9.531376   100

The time difference will become much more dramatic as the size of the datasets grows.

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I can give you a bunch of nested [.data.table calls:

set.seed(1)
require(data.table)
# generate dt, dt1 as above
dt[
    dt1[
        as.list(dt[,seq.Date(start,end,"day"),by="id"])
    ][,mean(var),by=id]
]

#    id      start        end          V1
# 1:  A 2010-01-01 2010-01-07  0.04475859
# 2:  B 2010-02-01 2010-02-09 -0.01681972
# 3:  C 2010-03-01 2010-03-11  0.39791318
# 4:  D 2010-04-01 2010-04-06  0.77854732

I'm using as.list to unset the key. I wonder if there's a better way than this...

require(microbenchmark)
require(plyr)
microbenchmark(
    adply=adply(dt, 1, myfunc),
    dtdtdt= dt[dt1[as.list(dt[,seq.Date(start,end,"day"),by="id"])][,mean(var),by=id]]
)

# Unit: milliseconds
#    expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#   adply 12.987334 13.247374 13.477386 14.371258 18.362505   100
#  dtdtdt  4.854708  4.944596  4.993678  5.233507  7.082461   100

EDIT: (eddi) Alternatives to the above that would require one less merge (as discussed in comments) are:

setkey(dt, NULL)

dt1[dt[, list(seq.Date(start,end,"day"), end), by=id]][,
    list(start = date[1], end = end[1], result = mean(var)), by = id]
# or
dt1[dt[, seq.Date(start,end,"day"), by=id]][,
    list(start = date[1], end = date[.N], result = mean(var)), by = id]
share|improve this answer
1  
You can make this a bit more clear if you return end in the first [] in addition to the sequence, then you won't need to do the last merge. Another option is calculating end from the by. In either case you'd be able to get rid of the as.list or setkey in that expression by unsetting the key for dt before starting. –  eddi Jul 11 '13 at 18:46
    
@eddi returning end together with the sequence should give the same as your first [] with nomatch=0 innit? Anyway thanks both, you were very helpful! –  Michele Jul 11 '13 at 19:08
    
@Michele, I'm not sure which step you're talking about, but at some point they do converge :) –  eddi Jul 11 '13 at 19:11
    
@eddi I'd characterize my solution as cumbersome, too :) [as you did in your initial comment, according to my inbox.] I don't really understand how to return end in a way that makes the merge I'm attempting work. Feel free to edit it in so I find out. I guess, besides being faster, your roll method wouldn't produce NA when days in the start-end range fail to show up in dt1, which is nice. I never really knew what these roll and nomatch arguments were for. +1 to question and answer for illustrating. –  Frank Jul 11 '13 at 19:29
1  
@Frank sorry missed your comment, see edit –  eddi Jul 11 '13 at 22:11

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