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I have two lists of IDs.

I would like to compare the two lists, in particular I am interested in the following figures:

  • How many IDs are both in list A and B
  • How many IDs are in A but not in B
  • How many IDs are in B but not in A

I would also love to draw a Venn diagram.

I need to do that in R, but I really do not know how.

Could you help me?

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3  
see ??intersect and ??setdiff... –  agstudy Jul 11 '13 at 16:01
1  
see Venn Diagrams with R? –  topchef Jul 11 '13 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

Here are some basics to try out:

> A = c("Dog", "Cat", "Mouse")
> B = c("Tiger","Lion","Cat")
> A %in% B
[1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE
> intersect(A,B)
[1] "Cat"
> setdiff(A,B)
[1] "Dog"   "Mouse"
> setdiff(B,A)
[1] "Tiger" "Lion" 

Similarly, you could get counts simply as:

> length(intersect(A,B))
[1] 1
> length(setdiff(A,B))
[1] 2
> length(setdiff(B,A))
[1] 2
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I'm usually dealing with large-ish sets, so I use a table instead of a Venn diagram:

xtab_set <- function(A,B){
    both    <-  union(A,B)
    inA     <-  both %in% A
    inB     <-  both %in% B
    return(table(inA,inB))
}

set.seed(1)
A <- sample(letters[1:20],10,replace=TRUE)
B <- sample(letters[1:20],10,replace=TRUE)
xtab_set(A,B)

#        inB
# inA     FALSE TRUE
#   FALSE     0    5
#   TRUE      6    3
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Ah, I didn't realize Venn diagrams contained counts...I thought they were supposed to show the items themselves. –  Frank Jul 11 '13 at 16:54

Yet an another way, with using %in% and boolean vectors of common elements instead of intersect and setdiff. I take it you actually want to compare two vectors, not two lists - a list is an R class that may contain any type of element, while vectors always contain elements of just one type, hence easier comparison of what is truly equal. Here the elements are transformed to character strings, as that was the most inflexible element type that was present.

first <- c(1:3, letters[1:6], "foo", "bar")
second <- c(2:4, letters[5:8], "bar", "asd")

both <- first[first %in% second] # in both, same as call: intersect(first, second)
onlyfirst <- first[!first %in% second] # only in 'first', same as: setdiff(first, second)
onlysecond <- second[!second %in% first] # only in 'second', same as: setdiff(second, first)
length(both)
length(onlyfirst)
length(onlysecond)

#> both
#[1] "2"   "3"   "e"   "f"   "bar"
#> onlyfirst
#[1] "1"   "a"   "b"   "c"   "d"   "foo"
#> onlysecond
#[1] "4"   "g"   "h"   "asd"
#> length(both)
#[1] 5
#> length(onlyfirst)
#[1] 6
#> length(onlysecond)
#[1] 4

# If you don't have the 'gplots' package, type: install.packages("gplots")
require("gplots")
venn(list(first.vector = first, second.vector = second))

Like it was mentioned, there are multiple choices for plotting Venn-diagrams in R. Here is the output using gplots.

venn diagram with gplots

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With sqldf: Slower but very suitable for data frames with mixed types:

t1 <- as.data.frame(1:10)
t2 <- as.data.frame(5:15)
sqldf1 <- sqldf('SELECT * FROM t1 EXCEPT SELECT * FROM t2') # subset from t1 not in t2 
sqldf2 <- sqldf('SELECT * FROM t2 EXCEPT SELECT * FROM t1') # subset from t2 not in t1 
sqldf3 <- sqldf('SELECT * FROM t1 UNION SELECT * FROM t2') # UNION t1 and t2

sqldf1  X1_10
1
2
3
4
sqldf2   X5_15
11
12
13
14
15


sqldf3 X1_10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

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