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Kind of a strange request.

Let's say I have the following list:

[1,2,3]

And I want something, say, the number 9, to pass through every index, to get the following list of lists:

[[9,1,2,3],
 [1,9,2,3],
 [1,2,9,3],
 [1,2,3,9]]

Any idea how to do this easily? Also, is there a name for this sort of thing?

Edit: I realize I can do something like the following:

lists=[]
for i in range(4):
  new_list = [1,2,3]
  new_list.insert(i,9)
  lists+=[new_list]

but I consider this inelegant. Thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
The for loop is the best choice. It's readable and easily understood. Wrap it in a function and you're good to go. –  Ethan Furman Jul 11 '13 at 16:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could do something like

l = [1,2,3]
new_l = [l[:i] + [9] + l[i:] for i in range(len(l) + 1)]
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice — I had just posted the same answer! –  Shane Holloway Jul 11 '13 at 16:12
1  
Yeah I was typing that in when his popped up too lol +1 –  Brian Jul 11 '13 at 16:12
1  
I was going to post the exact same thing. –  2rs2ts Jul 11 '13 at 16:38
    
Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  rhombidodecahedron Jul 11 '13 at 17:30

How about a for loop:

l = [1,2,3]
res = []
for i in xrange(len(l)+1):
    l2 = l[:]
    l2.insert(i,9)
    res.append(l2)

Here is another thing I thought of:

l = [1,2,3]
q = [l[:] for _ in range(len(l)+1)]
map(lambda(x):x.insert(q.index(x),9), q)

Then q will contain your list:

print q
[9, 1, 2, 3], [1, 9, 2, 3], [1, 2, 9, 3], [1, 2, 3, 9]]
share|improve this answer
    
Whoops, I edited my post around the same time that you posted this. I already had this solution; I'm looking for something "cuter" I guess. (Not that there's anything really wrong with this approach.) –  rhombidodecahedron Jul 11 '13 at 16:09

enumerate and repeat are your friends.

from itertools import repeat

some_list = [1, 2, 3]
new_lists = []
new_elt = 9
for i, lst in enumerate(L[:] for L in repeat(some_list, len(some_list)+1))
    lst.insert(i, new_elt)
    new_lists.append(lst)

print new_lists
share|improve this answer
1  
That list could be written as [[1,2,3]] * 4 and then 4 replaced to allow variable length. And the call to enumerate is missing. –  Brian Jul 11 '13 at 16:42
    
@Brian No, it cannot. That syntax creates 4 shallow copies of the list [1, 2, 3], meaning that instead of getting the 'moving nine' effect, all the resulting lists look like [9, 9, 9, 9, 1, 2, 3]. Try it in a REPL. –  user2479509 Jul 11 '13 at 16:53

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