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Code:

class C:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.w = 'foo'
        self.z = kwargs['z']
        self.my_function(self.z)    
    def my_function(self, inp):
        inp += '!!!'

input_args = {}
input_args['z'] = 'bar'
c = C(**input_args)
print c.z

Expected Result

bar!!!

Actual Result

bar

How do you call a class' method in init?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Modify self.z, not inp:

def my_function(self, inp):
    self.z += '!!!'

Secondly strings are immutable in python, so modifying inp won't affect the original string object.

See what happens when self.z is mutable object:

class C:
    def __init__(self, ):
        self.z = []
        self.my_function(self.z)    
    def my_function(self, inp):
        inp += '!!!'
        print inp
        print self.z

C()        

output:

['!', '!', '!']
['!', '!', '!']
share|improve this answer
    
Ah! So it was a problem with my example! In my real-world problem, I'd be doing composition. Thanks. – Noob Saibot Jul 11 '13 at 17:06

The problem is, you are not actually modifying the value of self.z

Try this instead

class C:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.w = 'foo'
        self.z = kwargs['z']
        self.z = self.my_function(self.z)    

    def my_function(self, inp):
        inp += '!!!'
        return inp

input_args = {}
input_args['z'] = 'bar'
c = C(**input_args)
print c.z
share|improve this answer

Your code does not contain any classmethods.

You are in fact calling the instance method which you are calling, it just doesn't do anything other than return None.

Also, if this is python 2.7, in general things will work better if you inherit from object (or some other class).

share|improve this answer

You are correctly calling the class method, however parameters are passed by value, not by reference. If you modify inp in the method my_function, it doesn't reflect on self.z.

share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter Could you explain why you downvoted my answer? – Pit Jul 11 '13 at 16:43
1  
Not downvoted. But in python parameters are passed by reference. The problem is that the reference is changed when do a += to strings or numbers (but list won't). – neuront Jul 11 '13 at 16:45
    
It's not a class method. – 2rs2ts Jul 11 '13 at 16:48
1  
@Pit The first line in the answer you link correctly states that parameters are passed by value. They are passed only by value. – Marcin Jul 11 '13 at 16:52
1  
@Pit you're slightly incorrect. In both cases, (the references to) the objects are passed by value; the difference is handled by the way Python implements operators as method calls. When an object has an __iadd__ attribute (like list), a += b will be translated to a.__iadd__(b), but when that operation is performed on objects without __iadd__, the translation defaults to a = a.__add__(b). – JAB Jul 11 '13 at 17:10

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