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So I'm trying to write a copy constructor for class E such that it will get every int x from each class and assign it to its counterpart. How do I cast the right side?

class A
{
public:
    int x;
};

class B: public virtual A
{
public:
    int x;
};

class C: public virtual A
{
public:
    int x;
};

class D : public B, public C
{
public:
    int x;
};

class E: public D
{
public:
    int x;

    E(const E& e)
    {
        E::x = (E)e.x // problem
        D::x = ?
        C::x = ?
        B::x = ?
        A::x = ?
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
No templates present. Also, why would an int cast to an instance of E? – Marcin Jul 11 '13 at 16:49
    
because I want to copy E's x into the x of the current instance of E, same for D and C, and so in the hierarchy. And there are no templates, somebody changed the title... – Ivan Prodanov Jul 11 '13 at 16:58
    
There is no reason to cast this int. – Marcin Jul 11 '13 at 16:59
    
if I just leave it like 'x = e.x' it copies A's x from A's x. What about B,C,D and E's x? – Ivan Prodanov Jul 11 '13 at 16:59
    
Please update your question to actually reflect what your problem is. Please also include a runnable example illustrating the problem. – Marcin Jul 11 '13 at 17:02

You do not need to cast an int to assign it to an int. Just do:

self->x = ((E)e).x;
D::x = ((D)e).x;
share|improve this answer
E::x = e.E::x;
D::x = e.D::x;
C::x = e.C::x;
B::x = e.B::x;
A::x = e.A::x;

Though it might be wiser to give each class a suitable copy constructor, with a suitable initialization list invoking copy constructors of base classes.

share|improve this answer

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