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I have the following code:

USERS = None

class User(object):
    name = ""
    jobs = []

    def __init__(self, name, jobs):
        self.name = name
        self.jobs = jobs


def main():
    global USERS

    jobs = ["Mow", "Rake", "Mulch"]

    USERS = [User("Fred", jobs), User("Mark", jobs), User("Greg", jobs)]

    other_function(USERS[0].jobs[0])

    return

def other_function(job):

    job = "Nothing"

    save(USERS)

    return


def save(users):
    f = open("save_file", "w")

    for user in users:
        f.write(user.name+"\n")
        for job in user.jobs:
            f.write(job+"\n")

    return

if __name__=='__main__':
    main()
    raw_input()

The output file 'save_file' looks like:

Fred
Mow
Rake
Mulch
Mark
Mow
Rake
Mulch
Greg
Mow
Rake
Mulch

It's not doing what I want - I want the change to job in other_function to be reflected in the global variable USERS, so that the function save will output the correct data to file (aka line 2 in file would be 'Nothing' instead of 'Mow'). I've tried declaring global USERS in other_function but that did not work. Any help is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
For those wondering the solution/cause - the object USERS[0].jobs[0] is a string. A string will get passed by value in the instance 'other_function(USERS[0].jobs[0])'. A way to circumvent this is to have a class that encapsulates USERS[0].jobs[0], e.g. 'class job' with member variable 'name = "Rake"' –  Evan Defend Jul 11 '13 at 18:32
    
It is a choice, but it is absolutely not the better one. Return a value can be much simpler. –  zhangyangyu Jul 11 '13 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

You have to realize that the job in other_function has nothing to do with USERS except the value of it equals USERS[0].job[0]. So whatever you do on it, the USERS won't change. It has nothing to do with global. So change your code to:

def main():
    global USERS

    jobs = ["Mow", "Rake", "Mulch"]
    USERS = [User("Fred", jobs), User("Mark", jobs), User("Greg", jobs)]
    USERS[0].jobs[0] = other_function(USERS[0].jobs[0])

    save(USERS)

def other_function(job):
    job = 'Nothing' #do something on the value
    return job
share|improve this answer
    
I suppose that makes sense. But - the above code wouldn't allow 'other_function' to accept dynamic 'job' input, which is what I want. –  Evan Defend Jul 11 '13 at 17:39
    
How about the code I have updated. @EvanDefend –  zhangyangyu Jul 11 '13 at 17:46
    
That would work, sure. My posted code is really only a simplification of a larger idea - in the real code, I would pass something like "users[0].jobs[0].logs[0].search_attrs[0]. The nesting is much more complex. What I really need is a to make sure that 'job' is always a pointer to the corresponding member in the global 'USERS' list. I can't find anything on whether that is possible or not. –  Evan Defend Jul 11 '13 at 17:55
    
I think what you want is not accessible in Python. I have searched a lot. The best way I can figure out is the code I have updated. @EvanDefend –  zhangyangyu Jul 11 '13 at 18:28

I do not believe you are actually modifying USERS in other_function before you pass it to your save() function.

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