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I am implementing a multi-threaded application which makes extensive use of OpenSSL crypto library.

I have followed the guidelines in several posts here (Tutorial on Using OpenSSL with pthreads, OpenSSL and multi-threads), websites (eg libcurl opensslthreadlock.c) and mainly the sample code in the crypto/threads/mttest.c program contained within OpenSSL source code. The examples therein referenced mostly deal with OpenSSL's static lock callback functions. But, also according to OpenSSL documentation on the matter (OpenSSL: threads(3)) and on The Definitive Guide to Linux Network Programming (pages 255-259), it may sometimes be necessary to define some functions for dynamic lock management.

Hence, I have implemented initialization and cleanup functions that set both types of lock management functions (static and dynamic). These functions are as follows:

static unsigned long _thread_id_function(void) {
  return ((unsigned long) pthread_self());
}

static void _locking_function(int mode, int id, const char *file, int line) {
  if(mode & CRYPTO_LOCK) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_buffer[id]);
  } else {
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_buffer[id]);
  }
}

static struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value* _dyn_create_func(const char *file, int line) {
  struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value *value;
  value = (struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value *) malloc(sizeof(struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value));
  pthread_mutex_init(&value->mutex,NULL);
  return value;
}

static void _dyn_destroy_func(struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value *l, 
  const char *file, int line) {
  pthread_mutex_destroy(&l->mutex);
  free(l);
  return;
}

static void _dyn_lock_func(int mode, struct CRYPTO_dynlock_value *l,
  const char *file, int line) {
  if(mode & CRYPTO_LOCK) {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&l->mutex);
  } else {
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&l->mutex);
  }
}

static int _static_init() {

  int i;

  mutex_buffer = (pthread_mutex_t *) malloc(CRYPTO_num_locks()*sizeof(pthread_mutex_t));

  for(i=0; i<CRYPTO_num_locks(); i++) {
    pthread_mutex_init(&mutex_buffer[i], NULL);
  }

  CRYPTO_set_id_callback(_thread_id_function);
  CRYPTO_set_locking_callback(_locking_function);

  return 0;

}

static int _static_cleanup() {

  int i;

  CRYPTO_set_id_callback(NULL);
  CRYPTO_set_locking_callback(NULL);

  for(i=0; i<CRYPTO_num_locks(); i++) {
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutex_buffer[i]);
  }

  free(mutex_buffer); mutex_buffer = NULL;
  return 0;
}

static int _dyn_init() {
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_create_callback(_dyn_create_func);
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_lock_callback(_dyn_lock_func);
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_destroy_callback(_dyn_destroy_func);
  return 0;
}

static int _dyn_cleanup() {
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_create_callback(NULL);
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_lock_callback(NULL);
  CRYPTO_set_dynlock_destroy_callback(NULL);
  return 0;
}

int cryptothread_init() {
  _static_init();
  _dyn_init();
  return 0;
}

int cryptothread_cleanup() {
  _static_cleanup();
  _dyn_cleanup();
  return 0;
}

From my main program, I call the cryptothread_init function to initialize the callbacks. However, if I run Valgrind's Helgrind tool, several race conditions occur, e.g.:

==18797== Possible data race during write of size 4 at 0x75D2F28 by thread #3

==18797== Locks held: none

==18797== at 0x7276DCA: CRYPTO_malloc (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72F6290: EVP_MD_CTX_copy_ex (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72FD57B: EVP_SignFinal (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x407007: sign_data (main.c:919)

==18797== by 0x4C2B5AD: ??? (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_helgrind-amd64-linux.so)

==18797== by 0x5CACB4F: start_thread (pthread_create.c:304)

==18797== by 0x6F4EA7C: clone (clone.S:112)

==18797==

==18797== This conflicts with a previous write of size 4 by thread #4

==18797== Locks held: none

==18797== at 0x7276DCA: CRYPTO_malloc (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72B0086: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72B05AC: bn_expand2 (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72B08C9: BN_set_word (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72B1317: BN_CTX_get (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72AD68A: BN_div (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72D1841: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797== by 0x72D2B9A: ??? (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.0.0)

==18797==

Still, the lock callbacks do not throw any error/warning message. Any hint about what may I be missing?

share|improve this question
    
I'm seeing this as well... did you ever determine how to configure OpenSSL and valgrind to resolve or mask these reports? –  mark May 19 at 21:57

1 Answer 1

You should read exactly. openSSL provides two possibilities to set callbacks for to do locking.

The so called "static" and "dynamic" way. You are configuring both. I use the old fashioned static one and there are no problems. I think there is only thing why you should use the dynamic one: Decrease used memory. But this is ridiculous regarding the used memory.

At the end you can see at the threads(3).html in section "Notes" the dynamic way of mutexing is not enabled.

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't accurate. The two locking methodologies are not mutually-exclusive. In fact, some guides recommend doing both so that as dynamic use in the library increases your application can gain performance. Memory use is not a primary consideration of dynamic locks... performance is. –  mark May 19 at 21:56

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