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I am trying to edit a search tool using linq,

What I like a filter in where clause is (ItemNumber == X AND ( StatementStatus == SatusA Or StatementStatus == StatusB ) )

But right now, it is like:

What I like a filter in where clause is (ItemNumber == X AND StatementStatus == SatusA Or StatementStatus == StatusB )

as AND has higher operational priority over OR the result is not what I want. :) Could you please help?

using (var ctx = new MyContext())    {
    Func<Statement, bool> filter = null;

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(request.ItemNumber))
        filter = new Func<Statement, bool>(s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber));

    if (request.StatusA)
        filter = filter == null ? new Func<Statement, bool>(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA) : 
            filter.And(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA);

    if (request.StatusB)
        filter = filter == null ? new Func<Statement, bool>(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB) :
            filter.Or(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB);

    var results = ctx.Statements
        .Include("StatementDetails")
        .Include("StatementDetails.Entry")
        .Where(filter)
        .Take(100)
        .Select(s => new StatementSearchResultDTO{ ....
        }
}

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Did you like my answer? Or you still have some problems? –  nsinreal Jul 15 '13 at 6:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's happens not because AND have higher priority than OR. What happens in reality:

var firstFilter = ...; // itemNumber
var secondFilter = ...; // statusA
var firstAndSecondFilter = firstFilter.And(secondFilter); // itemNumber && statusA
var thirdFilter = ...; // statusB
var endFilter = firstAndSecondFilter.Or(thirdFilter) // (itemNumber && statusA) || statusB.

The problem - wrong control flow. You must to do something like that:

var filterByA = ...;
var filterByB = ...;
var filterByAorB = filterByA.Or(filterByB);
var filterByNumber = ...;
var endFiler = filterByNumber.And(filterByAorB);

And your code is bad, not just because it works wrong, but because it's hard to write code in such style. Reasons:

  1. This code doesn't follow DRY principle. You have two same lambdas that checks for StatusA (look in your ternary operator) and two same lambdas that checks for StatusB
  2. You have too long ternary operator with null checks. That's bad because you don't see general picture, your eyes focused on syntax problems. You may write and extension method AndNullable for funcs. Like this:

    static Func<T1, TOut> AndNullable<T1, TOut>(this Func<T1, TOut> firstFunc, Func<T1, TOut> secondFunc) {
        if (firstFunc != null) {
             if (secondFunc != null)
                return firstFunc.And(secondFunc);
             else
                return firstFunc;
        }
        else {
             if (secondFunc != null)
                return secondFunc;
             else
                return null;
        }
    }
    

    And that same for Or. Now your code can be wroted like this:

    Func<Statement, bool> filter = null;
    
    if (request.StatusA)
        filter = s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA;
    
    if (request.StatusB)
        filter = filter.OrNullable(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB);
    
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(request.ItemNumber))
        filter = filter.AndNullable(s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber));
    

    Reads more better.

  3. Your filter is global filter. Writing of global filter is simpler for few filter conditions and number of lines is small, but it's more complicated to understand your filter. Rewrite it in this way:

    Func<Statement, bool> filterByStatusA = null;
    Func<Statement, bool> filterByStatusB = null;
    
    if (request.StatusA)
        filterByStatusA = s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA;
    
    if (request.StatusB)
        filterByStatusB = s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB;
    
    Func<Statement, bool> filterByStatuses = filterByStatusA.OrNullable(filterByStatusB);
    
    Func<Statement, bool> filterByItemNumber = null;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(request.ItemNumber))
        filterByItemNumber = s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber);
    
    Func<Statement, bool> endFilter = filterByItemNumber.And(filterByStatuses);
    

Okay, we have outthinked how we can write filters by combining them as Func<..> but we still have problems.

  1. What problems we will got, if result filter is null? Answer: ArgumentNullException due to documentation. We must to think about this case.

  2. What another problems we can got with using of simple Func<...>? Well, you must to know difference between IEnumerable<T> and IQueryable<T> interfaces. In simple words, all operations on IEnumerable causes simple iteratation over all elements (well, it's lazy, IEnumerable really slower than IQueryable). So, for example, combining of Where(filter), Take(100), ToList() on collection that have 10000 elements that are bad for this filter and 400 elements that are good will cause iterating over 10100 elements. If you wrote similar code for IQueryable the request of filtering will send on database server and this server will iterate only ~400 (or 1000, but not 10100), if you have configured indexes on database. So what happens in your code.

    var results = ctx.Statements // you are getting DbSet<Statement> that implements interface IQueryable<Statement> (and IQueryable<T> implements IEnumerable<T>)
                     .Include("StatementDetails") // still IQueryable<Statement>
                     .Include("StatementDetails.Entry") // still IQueryable<Statement>
                     .Where(filter) // Cuz your filter is Func<..> and there are no extension methods on IQueryable that accepts Func<...> as parameter, your IQueryable<Statement> casted automatically to IEnumerable<Statement>. Full collection will be loaded in your memory and only then filtered. That's bad
                     .Take(100) // IEnumerable<Statement>
    .Select(s => new StatementSearchResultDTO { .... // IEnumerable<Statement> -> IEnumerable<StatementSearchResultDTO>
    }
    

Okay. Now you understand the problem. So, simple right code for you can be writed in this way:

using (var ctx = new MyContext())    {
    results = ctx.Statements
        .Include("StatementDetails")
        .Include("StatementDetails.Entry")
        .AsQueryable();

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(request.ItemNumber))
        results = results.Where(s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber));

    if (request.StatusA) {
        if (request.StatusB)
            results = results.Where(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA || 
                                         s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA);
        else 
            results = results.Where(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA);
    }
    else {
        if (request.StatusB) {
            results = results.Where(s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB);
        }
        else {
            // do nothing
        }
    }

    results = .Take(100)
              .Select(s => new StatementSearchResultDTO{ ....
              };

    // .. now you can you results.
}

Yeah, totally ugly, but now your database solves how to find Statements that satisfy the filter. Therefore, this request is quickly as possible. Now we must understand what magic happens in code I written upper. Let's compare two examples of code:

results = results.Where(s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber));

And this:

Func<Statement, bool> filter = s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber);
results = results.Where(filter);

What the difference? Why first is more faster? Answer: when compiler sees first code, it examines that type of results is IQueryable<T> and IEnumerable<T> so that condition inside of brackets can have type Func<Statement, bool> (compiled function) or Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> (data, that can be compiled in function). And compiler chooses Expression (why - really dunno, just chooses). After request of first object query compiled not in C# statement, but in SQL statement and sends to server. Your SQL server can optimize request, because of indexes existing.

Well, the more better way - to write your own expressions. There are different ways to write your own expression, but there is a way to write it with not ugly syntax. The problem that you can't just invoke one expression from another - that doesn't supported by Entity Framework and can be not supported by another ORM's. So, we can use PredicateBuilder by Pete Montgomery: link. And then write two simple extensions on expressions suitable for us.

public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> OrNullable<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> first, Expression<Func<T, bool>> second)
{
    if (first != null && second != null)
        return first.Compose(second, Expression.OrElse);

    if (first != null)
        return second;

    if (second != null)
}

And that same for And. And now we can write our filter:

{
    Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> filterByStatusA = null;
    Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> filterByStatusB = null;

    if (request.StatusA)
        filterByStatusA = s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA;

    if (request.StatusB)
        filterByStatusB = s => s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusB;

    Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> filterByStatuses = filterByStatusA.OrNullable(filterByStatusB);

    Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> filterByItemNumber = null;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(request.ItemNumber))
        filterByItemNumber = s => s.StatementDetails.Any(sd => sd.ItemNumber == request.ItemNumber);

    Expression<Func<Statement, bool>> endFilter = filterByItemNumber.And(filterByStatuses);

    requests = ...;
    if (endFilter != null)
       requests = requests.Where(endFilter);
}

You can got a problem, because class ExpressionVisitor in PredicateBuilder in .NET < 4.0 is sealed. You can get write your own ExpressionVisitor or just copy it from this article.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I forgot to say: all code is untested. There were tests on more simpler examples, but not with database and your classes –  nsinreal Jul 11 '13 at 23:11
    
Thank you for all time you spent answering my question. –  Pooya Sep 9 '13 at 15:00

OK, here is the way I have solved it:

filter.And(s => (request.StatusA && s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StatusA) ||
                            (request.StatusB && s.StatementStatus == StatementStatusType.StautsB) ||
                            !(request.StatusA || request.StatusB)); //None selected = All selected

Any comments?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, fully wrong. I am writing now a big answer to your question. From line new MyContext() I think that you are using Entity Framework or some another ORM? –  nsinreal Jul 11 '13 at 21:51
1  
There is small problem in this code: it's slow. You call getter of request.StatusA and getter of request.StatusB on each Statement and that will cause some small perfomance problems. Btw, real problem that you use Func<>, not Expression<Func<..>> –  nsinreal Jul 11 '13 at 23:15

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