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Given an array of Letter_Number combinations, how can I sort by letter first, then number:

( B_5   A_11   C_0   A_10    A_1 )

to get:

( A_1   A_10   A_11   B_5    C_0 )

?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

By default, sort compares lexically. So if you want to treat the numbers as actual numbers where 010 > 1 and 2 < 11, then this is more like what you need:

my @list = qw(B_5 A_11 C_0 A_10 A_1);
my @sorted = sort char_then_num @list;

sub char_then_num {
    my ($a_char, $a_num) = split '_', $a;
    my ($b_char, $b_num) = split '_', $b;
    return $a_char cmp $b_char
             ||
        $a_num <=> $b_num;
}
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Perfect, thanks! –  LKramer Jul 11 '13 at 19:37
4  
The disadvantage of this method is that it splits certain elements repeatedly, and more importantly, it has duplicate code. –  ikegami Jul 11 '13 at 19:38
1  
@ikegami I think this is easier to read for people newer to perl, including me. –  kjprice Jul 11 '13 at 19:48
1  
@ikegami I ran the sort both ways, using maps and using splits, using his 5 elements. Using the splits was faster by more than an order of magnitude. –  kjprice Jul 11 '13 at 19:49
2  
@kjprice, gist.github.com/anonymous/5978996 Yours is actually a itsy fraction faster (not an order of magnitude, 10.0 microsecond vs 10.8 microsecond), even for somewhat longer lists. The overhead of ST is not making up the savings. –  ikegami Jul 11 '13 at 20:38
use Sort::Key::Natural qw( natsort );
my @sorted = natsort @data;

Or if you wanted to avoid modules,

my @sorted =
   map $_->[0],
    sort {  $a->[1] cmp $b->[1] || $a->[2] <=> $b->[2] }
     map [ $_, split /_/ ],
      @data;
share|improve this answer
    
Is the second one Schwartzian transform? –  doubleDown Jul 11 '13 at 19:45
    
Yes. It inflates each item with the split data, sorts on it, then deflates back to the original item. –  Oesor Jul 11 '13 at 20:17

Try the CPAN module Sort::Naturally.

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Easy and efficient:

my @list = qw(B_5 A_11 C_0 A_10 A_2);

my @sorted = map $_->[0], sort {$a->[1] cmp $b->[1] or $a->[2] <=> $b->[2]} map [$_, split'_'], @list;

Edit:

Using Schwartzian Transformation makes huge difference even for pretty small values:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

our $chars = join("","A".."Z");

sub genlist
{
    my $count = shift;
    return map join("_", substr($chars, rand(26),1), int(rand(100))),
        1 .. $count;
}

sub nostcmp {
    my ($a_char, $a_num) = split '_', $a;
    my ($b_char, $b_num) = split '_', $b;
    return $a_char cmp $b_char
             ||
        $a_num <=> $b_num;
}

sub nost {
   return sort nostcmp @_;
}

sub st {
    return
       map $_->[0],
        sort { $a->[1] cmp $b->[1] || $a->[2] <=> $b->[2] }
         map [ $_, split '_' ],
          @_;
}


my %tests = (
   nost => 'my @sorted = nost(@list);',
   st   => 'my @sorted = st(@list);',
);


$_ = 'use strict; use warnings; our @list; ' . $_
   for values %tests;

sub measure
{
    my $count = shift;
    print "Count $count:\n";
    local our @list = genlist($count);
    cmpthese(-3, \%tests);
    print "\n";
}

measure $_ for 5,10,20,50,100;

And results:

Count 5:
         Rate nost   st
nost  82195/s   -- -21%
st   103392/s  26%   --

Count 10:
        Rate nost   st
nost 35430/s   -- -34%
st   53589/s  51%   --

Count 20:
        Rate nost   st
nost 13228/s   -- -48%
st   25277/s  91%   --

Count 50:
       Rate nost   st
nost 4157/s   -- -53%
st   8935/s 115%   --

Count 100:
       Rate nost   st
nost 1637/s   -- -58%
st   3889/s 138%   --
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Looks familiar, hehe –  ikegami Jul 11 '13 at 19:39
    
You was faster ;-) We both know why and how use Schwartzian transformation. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jul 11 '13 at 19:40

The order you're looking for is already sort's default behavior... so just sort:

my @list = qw(B_5 A_11 C_0 A_10 A_1);
my @sorted = sort @list;
share|improve this answer
    
Probably the original poster does not like the result if "A_2" is added. –  Slaven Rezic Jul 11 '13 at 19:27
2  
default sort is lexicographic, not numeric –  Hunter McMillen Jul 11 '13 at 19:28
    
No, it's not. He just used wrong example. Here is counter example qw(B_5 A_11 C_0 A_10 A_5). A_5 should be first. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jul 11 '13 at 19:28
    
I think your downvotes are rather premature -- OP did not specify he was looking for natural sort of the numeric part. –  Alex Howansky Jul 11 '13 at 19:31
    
He said he wanted to sort the numbers. You code places 10 before 5. –  ikegami Jul 11 '13 at 19:36

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