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I'm having trouble with generating a build setup that allows shared libraries to be built in both Linux and Windows using gcc and MinGW, respectively. In Linux, a shared library doesn't have to resolve all dependencies at compile time; whereas, this appears to the case in Windows. Here is the problem setup:


$ cat foo.h 
#ifndef FOO_H
#define FOO_H
void printme();
#endif

$ cat foo.c
#include "foo.h"
#include <stdio.h>
void printme() {
    printf("Hello World!\n");
}

$ cat bar.h
#ifndef BAR_H
#define BAR_H
void printme2();
#endif

$ cat bar.c
#include "bar.h"
#include "foo.h"
void printme2() {
    printme();
    printme();
}

$ cat main.c
#include "bar.h"
int main(){
    printme2();
}

$ cat Makefile 
.c.o:
        gcc -fPIC -c $<

all: foo.o bar.o main.o
        gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.so
        gcc -shared bar.o -o libbar.so
        gcc main.o  -Wl,-rpath=. -L . -lbar -lfoo -o main

Now, in Linux, this compiles and runs just fine:

$ make
gcc -fPIC -c foo.c
gcc -fPIC -c bar.c
gcc -fPIC -c main.c
gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.so
gcc -shared bar.o -o libbar.so
gcc main.o  -Wl,-rpath=. -L . -lbar -lfoo -o main

$ ./main 
Hello World!
Hello World!

In Windows, we need to change so to dll, which is minor and fine:

$ cat Makefile 
.c.o:
        gcc -fPIC -c $<

all: foo.o bar.o main.o
        gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.dll
        gcc -shared bar.o -o libbar.dll
        gcc main.o  -Wl,-rpath=. -L . -lbar -lfoo -o main

However, when we try to build, we get the following error:

$ make
gcc -fPIC -c foo.c
foo.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -fPIC -c bar.c
bar.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -fPIC -c main.c
main.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.dll
gcc -shared bar.o -o libbar.dll
bar.o:bar.c:(.text+0x7): undefined reference to `printme'
bar.o:bar.c:(.text+0xc): undefined reference to `printme'
collect2.exe: error: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [all] Error 1

Now, we can fix the error by simply including the objects from foo.o into libbar.dll:

$ cat Makefile 
.c.o:
        gcc -fPIC -c $<

all: foo.o bar.o main.o
        gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.dll
        gcc -shared bar.o foo.o -o libbar.dll
        gcc main.o  -Wl,-rpath=. -L . -lbar -lfoo -o main

$ make
gcc -fPIC -c foo.c
foo.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -fPIC -c bar.c
bar.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -fPIC -c main.c
main.c:1:0: warning: -fPIC ignored for target (all code is position independent) [enabled by default]
gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.dll
gcc -shared bar.o foo.o -o libbar.dll
gcc main.o -Wl,-rpath=. -L . -lbar -lfoo -o main 

$ ./main 
Hello World!
Hello World!

However, I don't like this approach since libbar.dll now contains symbols for both foo and bar. In Linux, it only contains symbols for bar. This separation is important for situations where a library depends on some standard numerical library like BLAS. I'd like to be able to deploy the shared library and have it depend on the optimized version of the numerical library on the user's machine and not my own.

In any case, what's the proper procedure to create a shared library where not all of the symbols are present at compile time?

In case it matters, I compiled these examples with gcc 4.6.3 on Linux and mingw-get-inst-20120426.exe with gcc 4.7.2 on Windows.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

On Windows, you need to create an import library for the DLL. An import library looks like a static library, in that it defines all of the needed symbols, but it doesn't have the actual function implementations, it just has stubs. The import library will resolve the "undefined reference" errors while avoiding static linking.

To create an import library with MinGW, follow the instructions here. The key is that when building the DLL, you must pass the option -Wl,--out-implib,libexample_dll.a to the linker to generate the import library libexample_dll.a.

Then, when you compile your main executable, you use the -lexample_dll option (along with -L.) to link against the import library. So with your code, I think this should work:

all: foo.o bar.o main.o
    gcc -shared foo.o -o libfoo.dll -Wl,--out-implib,libfoo.a
    gcc -shared bar.o foo.o -o libbar.dll -Wl,--out-implib,libbar.a
    gcc main.o  -Wl,-rpath=. -L. -lbar -lfoo -o main

Also, note that on Windows, the calling convention for exported functions in DLL is almost always __stdcall, not the default __cdecl, so if you want your DLLs to be usable by other software, I'd recommend making them __cdecl. But that's not strictly requires, as long as both the code in the DLL and the header files agree on what the calling convention is.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked great. As a minor comment, I used: "gcc -shared bar.o -L . -lfoo -o libbar.dll -Wl,--out-implib,libbar.a" in order to use the import library. –  wyer33 Jul 11 '13 at 20:10

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