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I want to read a binary file and display the result in a memo but not how to do with this error: "Incompatible types: 'string' and 'Array'", the code is this

unit yo;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    Memo1: TMemo;
    Button2: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  F: TFileStream;
  Buffer: array [0 .. 1023] of byte;
begin

  F := TFileStream.Create(ExtractFilePath(Application.ExeName)
      + 'yo.exe', fmOpenRead);

  while F.Position < F.Size do
  begin

    F.Read(Buffer, 1024);
    Memo1.Lines.Add(Buffer);

  end;

  F.Free;

end;

managed to avoid this error and to run the program without errors ?

anyone can help me?

share|improve this question
    
Well, what is the encoding of the text in the file? –  David Heffernan Jul 11 '13 at 19:43
    
@DavidHeffernan: It's not text. The poster is trying to display the content of an .EXE file in a memo in 1K byte lines. ??? –  Ken White Jul 11 '13 at 19:47
    
...so the text embedded in the EXE is probably UTF-16, isn't it? –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 '13 at 19:48
    
Ken White, yes, what I'm trying to do but I that error "Incompatible types: 'string' and 'Array'" –  14K Jul 11 '13 at 19:59
2  
You can't overcome this directly, because an array[] of Byte can't be assigned to a string, which is what Memo.Lines contain. string types are designed to hold Char values, not Byte arrays. You'd have to convert each individual Byte value to a Char using Chr(Buffer[Index]), and add each character to a string, and then pass the entire string to Memo1.Lines.Add. I'm not sure what value putting an executable's binary content into a Memo which is designed to hold text would be, though. Can you explain your goal here? –  Ken White Jul 11 '13 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't directly bypass this error, because a string and an array[] of Byte are not directly assignable.

Since binary content (the #0 character in particular, or the 0x00 hex value (C/C++)) won't be displayable in a TMemo anyway (the text would be terminated at the first #0 value), you'd need to replace it with something.

The easiest way to get past the compiler error is to change your array from array[] of Byte to array[] of AnsiChar, which can be directly assigned to a string (or typecast to one):

var
  Buffer: array[0..1023] of AnsiChar;
  TempStr: string;
begin
  // Fill buffer from stream
  TempStr := Buffer;
  Memo1.Lines.Add(TempStr);
  // The next line eliminates the need for `TempStr`
  // Memo1.Lines.Add(String(Buffer));
end;

However, like I said, this won't solve the problem of displaying in the memo. For instance, when actually reading a Windows executable, the first buffer displays MZP, because the fourth byte is a #0 and the memo terminates the string.

To overcome this limitation, you need to replace all #0 characters with something else. The problem with that, of course, is that any value you replace it with can also actually occur in the executable (since they're bytes, there are only 256 possible values). Again, the simple solution is to replace all #0 characters with 0 (#216):

var
  Buffer: array[0..1023] of AnsiChar;
  i: Integer;
  TempStr: string;
begin
  // Fill buffer as before
  for i := Low(Buffer) to High(Buffer) do
    if Buffer[i] = #0 then
      Buffer[i] := `Ø`;        // Try #144 instead
  TempStr := Buffer;
  Memo1.Lines.Add(TempStr);
  // You can still eliminate the string variable by typecasting
  // Memo1.Lines.Add(String(TempStr));
end;

Here's code for a TForm.FormCreate event that actually reads a 1K buffer from a Delphi console application, does the above replacement, and displays the content in a TMemo. Drop the TMemo on a form, set its Alignment property to alClient, and ScrollBars to ssVertical. Add a FormCreate event handler to the form, and use the following code for that event:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  Stream: TFileStream;
  Buffer: array[0..1023] of AnsiChar;
  TempStr: string;
  i: Integer;
begin
  Memo1.Clear;
  // Populate buffer elements
  Stream := TFileStream.Create('D:\Temp\Project2.exe', fmOpenRead);
  try
    Stream.Read(Buffer[0], SizeOf(Buffer));
  finally
    Stream.Free;
  end;
  // Replace null (#0) values with #216 (Ø)
  for i := Low(Buffer) to High(Buffer) do
    if Buffer[i] = #0 then
      Buffer[i] := 'Ø';
  TempStr := Buffer;
  Memo1.Lines.Add(TempStr);
end;

NOTE: If you're actually reading the entire binary file instead of just the first buffer, the last buffer might not be entirely full of the file content (you might not read a full buffer on the last pass). In that case, you want to mark the end of the buffer with a #0 so that the memo correctly displays that partial buffer. You can change the for loop to use something like this:

for i := Low(Buffer) to High(Buffer) do
begin
  if (i = BytesRead) then
  begin
    Buffer[i] := #0;   // Mark the end of the buffer and exit loop; 
    Break;
  end
  else if (Buffer[i] = #0) then
   Buffer[i] := 'Ø';
end;

Here's the output of reading a single buffer full:

Executable displayed in TMemo

share|improve this answer
1  
oh god this answer is big, +1 –  DK64 Jul 11 '13 at 22:42
1  
good and I found the solution thanks to everyone who helped me, but do not understand why all give me negative votes but still give them grace to all. –  14K Jul 11 '13 at 23:06

An array of bytes is not a string, so the compiler's message means exactly what it says. Bytes are numeric; strings are textual. Numbers aren't text, so somewhere in the process, you need to tell your program how to convert the numbers into text.

One way is to convert each numeric value into its corresponding digits. For example:

F.Read(Buffer, 1024);
s := '';
for b in Buffer do
  s := s + IntToStr(b);
Memo1.Lines.Add(s);

If you want each byte to be converted to the character with the corresponding numeric value, then you don't really need any conversion at all; just lie and tell the program that the file contains text so you can load it directly into the memo control:

Memo1.Lines.LoadFromFile(FileName);

If you want the bytes in the file that can represent printable characters to be displayed as-is, and the ones that represent non-printable characters to be displayed numerically, then you can process each character separately, similarly to the loop above:

F.Read(Buffer, 1024);
s := '';
for b in Buffer do begin
  c := AnsiChar(b);
  if TCharacter.IsControl(c) then
    s := s + IntToStr(b)
  else
    s := s + c;
end;
Memo1.Lines.Add(s);

You can define the data conversion any way you want. All you have to do is specify what output you want, and then write the code that generates it. If you haven't specified what you want, and you can't describe it accurately, then you're not ready for the code yet.

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