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Basically I have

correctData = false//global variable
function calledFirst()
{
        xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
        {
            if(xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200)
            {

                proceedDiv.innerHTML = xmlhttp.responseText
                if(xmlhttp.responseText == "You may continue.")
                    correctData = true
                else
                    correctData = false
            }
        }
        xmlhttp.open("GET", "process.php?proposed="+encodeURIComponent(mon2),true);
        xmlhttp.send()
        calledSecond()
}
function calledSecond()
{
    if(!correctData)
    {
     //uh-oh

It appears calledSecond() is getting called before the Ajax response has finished and this is a problem because correctData's value depends on the Ajax response and calleSecond uses it. How can I fxi this?

UPDATE: Everyone's right it works if I put the function call in the call back section but why does it work? You just convinced me it doesn't work because Ajax is asynchronous so the rest of the code doesn't wait for the Ajax to complete so why would moving it to the call back section fix this?

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Put calledSecond() inside your onreadystatechange callback. –  Noah Freitas Jul 11 '13 at 20:12
    
@NoahFreitas can you explain why this works? –  Celeritas Jul 11 '13 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

That's why AJAX is asynchronous. The compiler does not wait for the AJAX call to complete, before it compiles the rest of the page.

If you want the calledSecond() to be called second, you have to put it into a callback function.

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This is happening because Ajax requests are handled asynchronously. Basically, other parts of your code will run while the request is being handled. If you have a function that is dependent on the response, put it in the callback. This will ensure that the function isnt called before the request has been completed because that call back will only be run once the request has been satisfied (readyState == 4 and status == 200). It looks like this:

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if(xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200)
        {
            proceedDiv.innerHTML = xmlhttp.responseText
            if(xmlhttp.responseText == "You may continue.")
                correctData = true
            else
                correctData = false
            calledSecond()
        }
    }

EDIT: Since it seems that you're confused about how asynchronous events work, I'll give you a brief rundown. Asynchronous events are different from regular events in that they are not subject to the program's flow. What that means is that they are executed totally independent of other events. This can be done for various reasons, but with AJAX, one reason is because it can take a long time waiting for the proper HTTP response and its much more efficient to run other things that are not dependent on that response while simultaneously waiting for the response. You have to be especially careful when doing asynchronous programming, because YOU CAN NEVER ASSUME THAT THE ASYNCHRONOUS EVENT WILL BE HANDLED BEFORE THE NEXT EVENT IN YOUR PROGRAM HAPPENS. If you have something that is dependent on the result of the asynchronous event, you must place that in the callback that is called once the asynchronous event is done. Hope this clarifies some things.

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So put another way the code continues to run but when the Ajax response happens the callback code is run? And after the callback is complete the line of execution picks up from where it left off? –  Celeritas Jul 11 '13 at 20:19
    
Kind of. When the Ajax request is launched, it will keep trying to call the callback function until it receives the correct ready state and http status. However, the program wont wait for this to happen, since it can take a while sometimes. So it will continue to run anything after the request, which is why anything that you have that is dependent on the result of the request must be placed in the callback. –  taylorc93 Jul 11 '13 at 20:22
    
@Celeritas updated my answer to provide a more in depth explanation of asynchronous events –  taylorc93 Jul 11 '13 at 20:34

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