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I am new to python.

Why am I not getting a new object when I call tempMyObject = myObject()?

class myObject(object):
  x = []

def getMyObject():
  tempMyObject = myObject()
  print "debug: %s"%str(tempMyObject.x)
  tempMyObject.x.append("a")
  return tempMyObject
#run
a = getMyObject()
b = getMyObject()

My debug prints out:

debug: []
debug: ["a"]

I don't understand why both of these debug arrays are not null, can someone please enlighten me?

EDIT: I found the mistake i put in python code on my post. I am using the .append("a") in my function

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4  
you need a def __init__(self) inside your class – inspectorG4dget Jul 11 '13 at 20:14
1  
Are you sure? I am no able to reproduce the same output. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 11 '13 at 20:14
4  
@LennartRegebro What? No. – delnan Jul 11 '13 at 20:19
1  
NO, you are right, this isn't a mutable class attribute after all. Or rather, I think it is, but the example code above is not. The example code above does not give the output the OP claims. – Lennart Regebro Jul 11 '13 at 20:26
1  
@LennartRegebro It does now, give it a try. I made a mistake when trasferring the code to Stack Overflow, sorry everybody – Quinma Jul 11 '13 at 20:28
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have created x as a class variable rather than an instance variable. To associate the variable with a particular instance of a class, do something like this:

class myObject(object):
    def __init__(self): # The "constructor"
        self.x = [] # Assign x to this particular instance of myObject

>>> debug: []
>>> debug: []

For a little better explanation of what's going on, have a look at this little mockup that demonstrates the same thing, a little more explicitly (if also more verbosely).

class A(object):
    class_var = [] # make a list attached to the A *class*
    def __init__(self):
        self.instance_var = [] # make a list attached to any *instance* of A

print 'class var:', A.class_var # prints []
# print 'instance var:', A.instance_var # This would raise an AttributeError!

print

a = A() # Make an instance of the A class
print 'class var:', a.class_var # prints []
print 'instance var:', a.instance_var # prints []

print

# Now let's modify both variables
a.class_var.append(1)
a.instance_var.append(1)
print 'appended 1 to each list'
print 'class var:', a.class_var # prints [1]
print 'instance var:', a.instance_var # prints [1]

print

# So far so good. Let's make a new object...
b = A()
print 'made new object'
print 'class var:', b.class_var # prints [1], because this is the list bound to the class itself
print 'instance var:', b.instance_var # prints [], because this is the new list bound to the new object, b

print

b.class_var.append(1)
b.instance_var.append(1)
print 'class var:', b.class_var # prints [1, 1]
print 'instance var:', b.instance_var # prints [1]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, yes the constructor in python is that __init__ function; it looked a little funny to me at first as well. – BlackVegetable Jul 11 '13 at 20:16
2  
@BlackVegetable technically, it's the initialiser (as the object is already constructed), and __new__ is the constructor, but yeah... – Jon Clements Jul 11 '13 at 20:16
1  
Ah, that is a good point. I've never directly used the __new__ magic. To someone coming from, say, Java, __init__ sure looks like a constructor though. – BlackVegetable Jul 11 '13 at 20:17
1  
x is indeed a class variable, but OP is overriding that class variable tempMyObject.x = ["a"], so his code should work fine. OP posted a wrong code. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 11 '13 at 20:24
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary Looks like he just edited it to make the problem reproducible-- append instead of reassignment (which was what I thought he was doing anyway, whoops) – Henry Keiter Jul 11 '13 at 20:27

There a few bits missing in your code, like the class initialiser first and foremost. The correct code is as follows:

class myObject(object):
    def __init__(self):
         self.x=[] #Set x as an attribute of this object.

def getMyObject():
  tempMyObject = myObject()
  print "debug: %s"%str(tempMyObject.x) #Just after object initialisation this is an     empty list.
  tempMyObject.x = ["a"]
  print "debug2: %s"%str(tempMyObject.x) #Now we set a value to it.
  return tempMyObject
#run
a = getMyObject()
b = getMyObject()

Now the debug will first print out an empty list and then, once it was set, "a". Hope this helps. I recommend looking at basic python classes tutorial.

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