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I would like a Java regular expression string that finds all vowels in a string unless they:

  1. are the first character or
  2. the next character following an underscore

AREA_ID becomes
AR_ID

LONG_NAME becomes
LNG_NM

HOME_ALONE becomes
HM_ALN

I have played around with http://gskinner.com/RegExr and I currently have the following regex that replaces all vowels except if it is the starting character

(?!^[AEIOU])[AEIOU]

I can't figure out how to get the second part (ignore vowel immediately following an underscore).

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You probably want to use word boundaries (\b). –  Brian Cain Jul 11 '13 at 20:26
    
You need to indicate what language or tool you're using, because different regex-engines are different. Most engines that support lookahead (which you're using) also support lookbehind (which you need), but (for example) JavaScript's doesn't. –  ruakh Jul 11 '13 at 20:27
    
By the way, a nitpick: a regex doesn't "remove" anything or "replace" anything; it merely matches. Regex-based replacement functionality is found in many languages, but the regex itself isn't actually doing the replacing! –  ruakh Jul 11 '13 at 20:29
    
I updated the post based on your comments –  sworded Jul 11 '13 at 20:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing you're using JavaScript, in which case this will do:

(?!(?:^|_))_?[AEIOU]

However, if you're using a regex flavour that supports lookbehinds, try this:

(?<!^)(?<!_)[AEIOU]

Note that two lookbehinds are needed because a lookbehind must have a fixed length, which "either the start of the string or an underscore" does not.

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Thank you. I was using the wrong lookaround. In this case, look behind is what I want, and not look ahead. –  sworded Jul 11 '13 at 20:35

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