Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to pass a function from a class to other function argument. I get this error.

error: the argument of type ‘void (A_t::)(int)’ doesn't match with ‘void (*)(int)’

Is there a way to manage this, still using the function inside the class a. Thanks in advance.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void procces(void func(int x),int y);

class A_t
{
   public:
      A_t();
      void function(int x)
      {
          cout << x << endl;
      }
};

int main()
{
   A_t a;

   procces(a.function,10);
}

void procces(void func(int x),int y)
{
    func(y);
    return;
}
share|improve this question
7  
That's right, function pointers and member function pointers are not the same thing. – chris Jul 11 '13 at 20:38
1  
See parashift.com/c++-faq/pointers-to-members.html which is the first thing that came up when I google'd "member function argument", "member function pointer" or "member function as argument to another function" – kfsone Jul 11 '13 at 21:40
1  
@kfsone, +1, but noone reads the C++ FAQ lite anymore, it's easier to go to SO than try to learn :-( – Jonathan Wakely Jul 11 '13 at 21:57
1  
That is true, i didn't research enough. my problem was that i didn't know that I was dealing with a "member function", which is obvious now. Thanks all. – Pablo Riera Jul 12 '13 at 17:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is an example of how you can use a pointer-to-function-member :

class A_t {
public:
    void func(int);
    void func2(int);
    void func3(int);
    void func4(int);
    ...
};

typedef  void (A_t::*fnPtr)(int);


int process(A_t& o, fnPtr p, int x)
{
    return ((o).*(p))(x);
}

int main()
{
    fnPtr p = &A_t::func;
    A_t a;
    process( a, p, 1 );
    ...
}

In the main function you can use the func member function as well as func2, func3 or func4.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That was really helpful. – Pablo Riera Jul 12 '13 at 17:24
    
You are welcome ! Don't forget to mark your question as answered to remove it from the unanswered page :) – Pierre Fourgeaud Jul 13 '13 at 17:27

function() must be declared as static in order for this to work. If you're putting a non-static member function in a class, it's tied to the specific instance of the class.

share|improve this answer

and if you want define an API for which you can map C function and C++ member function, define process as below, and use a binding to pass member function ....

NB: not tested (I'm on my mobile!)

 class A {
 public:
     void func(int);
     static void StaticWrapper(A* ptr, int i)
     { ptr->func(i);}
...
};

 typedef  void (CStyleCB*)(int);


  int process( CStyleCB p, int x)
  {
      return (*p)(x);
  }

  int main()
  {
      A a;
      process( bind(&A::StaticWrapper, this, _1),   1 );
       ...
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.