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I am currently working on a project in which I am required to write software that compares two images made up of the same area and draws a box around the differences. I wrote the program in c# .net in a few hours but soon realized it was INCREDIBLY expensive to run. Here are the steps I implemented it in.

  1. Created a Pixel class that stores the x,y coordinates of each pixel and a PixelRectangle class that stores a list of pixels along with width,height,x and y properties.

  2. Looped through every pixel of each image, comparing the colour of each corresponding pixels. If the colour was different I then created a new pixel object with the x,y coordinates of that pixel and added it to a pixelDifference List.

  3. Next I wrote a method that recursively checks each pixel in the pixelDifference list to create PixelRectangle objects that only contain pixels that are directly next to each other. (Pretty sure this bad boy is causing the majority of the destruction as it gave me a stack overflow error.)

  4. I then worked out the x,y coordinates and dimensions of the rectangle based on the pixels that were stored in the list of the PixelRectangle Object and drew a rectangle over the original image to show where the differences were.

My questions are: Am I going about this the correct way? Would a quad tree hold any value for this project? If you could give me the basic steps on how something like this is normally achieved I would be grateful. Thanks in advance.

  • Dave.
share|improve this question
    
Just a tought, but how do these images look in actual bytes? If they use a certain amount of bytes for a pixel, or possibly even one, you could check for differences in the actual file itself, rather than having to analyse the image pixel-by-pixel. Again, I'm not even sure if this is the case, just a thought. –  aevitas Jul 11 '13 at 21:32
    
When you say differences, do you mean the individual pixels are different? LockBits may help from what I can see –  Sayse Jul 11 '13 at 21:54
    
Why not just display the matches grayscale and red the differences? –  Blam Jul 11 '13 at 22:00

3 Answers 3

looks like you want to implement blob detection. my suggestion is not to reinvent the wheel and just use openCVSharp or emgu to do this. google 'blob detection' & opencv

if you want to do it yourself here my 2 cents worth:

first of all, let's clarify what you want to do. really two separate things:

  1. compute the difference between two images (i am assuming they are the same dimensions)

  2. draw a box around 'areas' that are 'different' as measured by 1. questions here are what is an 'area' and what is considered 'different'.

my suggestion for each step:

(my assumption is both images a grey scale. if not, compute the sum of colours for each pixel to get grey value)

1) cycle through all pixels in both images and subtract them. set a threshold on the absolute difference to determine if their difference is sufficient to represent and actual change in the scene (as opposed to sensor noise etc if the images are from a camera). then store the result in a third image. 0 for no difference. 255 for a difference. if done right this should be REALLY fast. however, in C# you must use pointers to get a decent performance. here an example of how to do this (note: code not tested!!) :

  /// <summary>
    /// computes difference between two images and stores result in a third image
    /// input images must be of same dimension and colour depth
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="imageA">first image</param>
    /// <param name="imageB">second image</param>
    /// <param name="imageDiff">output 0 if same, 255 if different</param>
    /// <param name="width">width of images</param>
    /// <param name="height">height of images</param>
    /// <param name="channels">number of colour channels for the input images</param>
    unsafe void ComputeDiffernece(byte[] imageA, byte[] imageB, byte[] imageDiff, int width, int height, int channels, int threshold)
    {
        int ch = channels;

        fixed (byte* piA = imageB, piB = imageB, piD = imageDiff)
        {

            if (ch > 1) // this a colour image (assuming for RGB ch == 3 and RGBA  == 4)
            {
                for (int r = 0; r < height; r++)
                {
                    byte* pA = piA + r * width * ch;
                    byte* pB = piB + r * width * ch;
                    byte* pD = piD + r * width; //this has only one channels!

                    for (int c = 0; c < width; c++)
                    {
                        //assuming three colour channels. if channels is larger ignore extra (as it's likely alpha)
                        int LA = pA[c * ch] + pA[c * ch + 1] + pA[c * ch + 2];
                        int LB = pB[c * ch] + pB[c * ch + 1] + pB[c * ch + 2];

                        if (Math.Abs(LA - LB) > threshold)
                        {
                            pD[c] = 255;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            pD[c] = 0;
                        }

                    }
                }
            }
            else //single grey scale channels
            {
                for (int r = 0; r < height; r++)
                {
                    byte* pA = piA + r * width;
                    byte* pB = piB + r * width;
                    byte* pD = piD + r * width; //this has only one channels!

                    for (int c = 0; c < width; c++)
                    {
                        if (Math.Abs(pA[c] - pB[c]) > threshold)
                        {
                            pD[c] = 255;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            pD[c] = 0;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

2)

not sure what you mean by area here. several solutions depending on what you mean. from simplest to hardest.

a) colour each difference pixel red in your output

b) assuming you only have one area of difference (unlikely) compute the bounding box of all 255 pixels in your output image. this can be done using a simple max / min for both x and y positions on all 255 pixels. single pass through the image and should be very fast.

c) if you have lots of different areas that change - compute the "connected components". that is a collection of pixels that are connected to each other. of course this only works in a binary image (i.e. on or off, or 0 and 255 as in our case). you can implement this in c# and i have done this before. but i won't do this for you here. it's a bit involved. algorithms are out there. again opencv or google connected components.

once you have a list of CC's draw a box around each. done.

share|improve this answer

You're pretty much going about it the right way. Step 3 shouldn't be causing a StackOverflow exception if it's implemented correctly so I'd take a closer look at that method.

What's most likely happening is that your recursive check of each member of PixelDifference is running infinitely. Make sure you keep track of which Pixels have been checked. Once you check a Pixel it no longer needs to be considered when checking neighbouring Pixels. Before checking any neighbouring pixel make sure it hasn't already been checked itself.

As an alternative to keeping track of which Pixels have been checked you can remove an item from PixelDifference once it has been checked. Of course, this may require a change in the way you implement your algorithm since removing an element from a List while checking it can bring a whole new set of issues.

share|improve this answer
    
i would say making list of pixels i way too slow. keep and update 4 variables during your image loop: x max, y max, x min, y min. this is then your box coordinates. –  dr.mo Jul 15 '13 at 13:43

There's a much simpler way of finding the difference of two images.

So if you have two images

Image<Gray, Byte> A;
Image<Gray, Byte> B;

You can get their differences fast by

A - B

Of course, images don't store negative values so to get differences in cases where pixels in image B are greater than image A

B - A

Combining these together

(A - B) + (B - A)

This is ok, but we can do even better.

This can be evaluated using Fourier transforms.

CvInvoke.cvDFT(A.Convert<Gray, Single>().Ptr, DFTA.Ptr, Emgu.CV.CvEnum.CV_DXT.CV_DXT_FORWARD, -1);
CvInvoke.cvDFT(B.Convert<Gray, Single>().Ptr, DFTB.Ptr, Emgu.CV.CvEnum.CV_DXT.CV_DXT_FORWARD, -1);

CvInvoke.cvDFT((DFTB - DFTA).Convert<Gray, Single>().Ptr, AB.Ptr, Emgu.CV.CvEnum.CV_DXT.CV_DXT_INVERSE, -1);
CvInvoke.cvDFT((DFTA - DFTB).Ptr, BA.Ptr, Emgu.CV.CvEnum.CV_DXT.CV_DXT_INVERSE, -1);

I find that the results from this method are much better. You can make a binary image out of this, ie: threshold the image so pixels with no change have 0 while pixels that have changes store 255.

Now as far as the second part of the problem goes, I suppose there's a simple crude solution:

Partition the image into rectangular regions. Perhaps there's no need to go as far as using quad trees. Say, an 8x8 grid... (For different results, you can experiment with different grid sizes).

Then use the convex hull function within these regions. These convex hulls can be turned into rectangles by finding the min and max x an y coordinates of their vertices.

Should be fast and simple

share|improve this answer
    
Rectangles that are positioned over the boundaries of the regions will be split. So you could add an additional step at the end to combine these rectangles if you need to. –  sav Jul 27 '13 at 17:47

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