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I'm trying to implement a quicksort in C#. I found code closely resembling my code below on the web:

public void Sort(List<int> list, int low, int high) 
    {
        int i = low;
        int j = high;

        IComparable pivot = list[(low + high) / 2];

        while (i <= j)
        {
            while (list[i].CompareTo(pivot) < 0)
            {
                i++;
            }
            while (list[j].CompareTo(pivot) > 0)
            {
                j--;
            }
            if (i <= j)
            {
                int temp = list[i];
                list[i++] = list[j]; // ??
                list[j--] = temp; // ??
            }
        }

        if (j > low)
        {
            Sort(list, low, j);
        }
        if (i < high)
        {
            Sort(list, i, high);
        }            
    }

The code works fine but I can't understand why i and j need to be incremented and decremented when swapping the integers in list[i] and list[j].

I'm new to sorting algorithms. I'd be very grateful for any insights..

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1 Answer 1

The increment and decrement aren't done for the swap itself, but in order for the pointers to be in place so that the sort will proceed with the next pair of elements on the next iteration.

Consider the following example.

4    1    7    3    5    4    8    1    9
          ↑         ↑              ↑
          i       pivot            j

The value at i is greater than pivot, and the one at j is less, making them eligible for a swap. However, once the swap is ready, it is pointless to re-compare the same two elements, since we already know that they're in the correct place. Thus, we progress i and j as part of the same operation.

4    1    1    3    5    4    8    7    9
               ↑    ↑         ↑
               i  pivot       j

Edit: The operations are postfix, meaning they are done after the assignment. The following would be equivalent:

int temp = list[i];
list[i] = list[j];
i = i + 1;
list[j] = temp;
j = j + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Does this mean that list[j] is assigned to list[i] and i is incremented in a single statement? –  The Furious Bear Jul 11 '13 at 23:30
    
Thanks Douglas; all clear now.. –  The Furious Bear Jul 11 '13 at 23:34

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