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Is there a well-known mistake I could be making here? I've got a script that's using .on() because an element is dynamically generated, and it isn't working. Just to test it out, I replaced the selector with the dynamic element's wrap, which is static, and it still didn't work! When I switched to plain old .click for the wrap it worked, though. (This just won't work for the dynamic element obviously, the one that matters.)

This works:

$("#test-element").click(function() {
    alert("click");
});

This doesn't:

$(document).on("click","#test-element",function() {
    alert("click");
});

UPDATE:

I right-clicked and did "Inspect Element" in Chrome to just double-check something, and then after that the click event worked. I refreshed and it didn't work, inspected element, and then it worked. What does this mean?

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Are you creating more than one element with the same ID ? –  adeneo Jul 11 '13 at 23:38
    
Posting just the jQuery without the relevant HTML makes it hard to assist. –  jmoerdyk Jul 11 '13 at 23:39
3  
Hiya OP, please check the version of Jquery you are using, :) or flick a fiddle I might help you out, –  Tats_innit Jul 11 '13 at 23:40
    
You code is supposed to work. The on function was added in jquery 1.7, make sure you have a recent version. Edit : proof for you that it works on fiddle –  Phil-R Jul 11 '13 at 23:42
    
Your second example works with the latest 1.x version of jQuery: jsfiddle.net/AJPdS –  Wookai Jul 11 '13 at 23:44
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are using the correct syntax for binding to the document to listen for a click event for an element with id="test-element".

It's probably not working due to one of:

  • Not using recent version of jQuery
  • Not wrapping your code inside of DOM ready
  • or you are doing something which causes the event not to bubble up to the listener on the document.

To capture events on elements which are created AFTER declaring your event listeners - you should bind to a parent element, or element higher in the hierarchy.

For example:

$(document).ready(function() {
    // This will work because we are listening on the 'document', 
    // for a click on an element with an ID of #test-element
    $(document).on("click","#test-element",function() {
        alert("click bound to document listening for #test-element");
    });

    // This will not work because there is no '#test-element'
    $("#test-element").on("click",function() {
        alert("click bound directly to #test-element");
    });

    // Create a dynamic element
    $('body').append('<div id="test-element">Click mee</div>');
});

In this example, only the "bound to document" alert will fire.

JSFiddle with jQuery 1.9.1

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Unfortunately, I'm using a recent version of Jquery, my code is properly wrapped, it's inside $(document).ready, and the event being clicked is the lowest-level element in the document. This is baffling. –  Mr. Lavalamp Jul 12 '13 at 0:01
    
I'd say "need to put the listener on the parent element" is not essential, although I too recommend it. Bubbling is what enables .on() to work. If we couldn't rely on bubbling to go past the immediate parent, it wouldn't be a great solution. –  iGanja Jul 12 '13 at 0:01
    
@iGanja - good point and as you suggest, 'need' is not the right word since there are other less ideal ways to accomplish this. I revised my answer. –  itsmejodie Jul 12 '13 at 0:07
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Try this:

$("#test-element").on("click" ,function() {
    alert("click");
});

The document way of doing it is weird too. That would make sense to me if used for a class selector, but in the case of an id you probably just have useless DOM traversing there. In the case of the id selector, you get that element instantly.

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2  
How is this different from $("#test-element").click(function() { ? –  Sushanth -- Jul 11 '13 at 23:43
1  
You have to use .on() to bind events to dynamically generated DOMs - anything that's bound with .click() will attempt to bind when the document is ready, and if the dom isn't present nothing will happen. –  JTravakh Jul 11 '13 at 23:45
1  
But using .on without using a selector is the same as directly applying the click event on it –  Sushanth -- Jul 11 '13 at 23:47
1  
Try wrapping up your code inside DOM Ready handler –  Sushanth -- Jul 11 '13 at 23:47
1  
I have actually read the docs, but the section on performance doesn't really have anything to do with delegated event handlers, and your code is not a delegated event handler. –  adeneo Jul 12 '13 at 0:19
show 12 more comments

This works:

<div id="start-element">Click Me</div>

$(document).on("click","#test-element",function() {
    alert("click");
});

$(document).on("click","#start-element",function() {
    $(this).attr("id", "test-element");
});

Here is the Fiddle

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That is not a dynamically generated element, as per the question. –  itsmejodie Jul 11 '13 at 23:52
    
@itsmejodie - agreed, but it is dynamically bound to the event handler. changing the id is essentially no different than appending a DOM element. –  iGanja Jul 11 '13 at 23:53
add comment

Your code should work, but I'm aware that answer doesn't help you. You can see a working example here (jsfiddle).

Jquery:

$(document).on('click','#test-element',function(){
    alert("You clicked the element with and ID of 'test-element'");
});

As someone already pointed out, you are using an ID instead of a class. If you have more that one element on the page with an ID, then jquery will return only the first element with that ID. There won't be any errors because that's how it works. If this is the problem, then you'll notice that the click event works for the first test-element but not for any that follow.

If this does not accurately describe the symptoms of the problem, then perhaps your selector is wrong. Your update leads me to believe this is the case because of inspecting an element then clicking the page again and triggering the click. What could be causing this is if you put the event listener on the actual document instead of test-element. If so, when you click off the document and back on (like from the developer window back to the document) the event will trigger. If this is the case, you'll also notice the click event is triggered if you click between two different tabs (because they are two different documents and therefore you are clicking the document.

If neither of these are the answer, posting HTML will go a long way toward figuring it out.

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